medium

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Related to Mediumistic: Mediumistic automatism

medium

 [me´de-um] (pl. mediums, me´dia) (L.)
1. an agent by which something is accomplished or an impulse is transmitted.
3. a preparation used in treating histologic specimens.
contrast medium a radiopaque substance used in radiography to permit visualization of body structures. Called also contrast agent.
culture medium a substance or preparation used to support the growth of microorganisms or other cells; called also medium.
dioptric media refracting media.
disperse medium dispersive m.
dispersion medium dispersive m.
dispersive medium the continuous phase of a colloid system; the medium in which the particles of the disperse phase are distributed, corresponding to the solvent in a true solution.
refracting media the transparent tissues and fluid in the eye through which light rays pass and by which they are refracted and brought to a focus on the retina.

me·di·um

, pl.

me·di·a

(mē'dē-yŭm, -ă),
1. A means; that through or by which an action is performed.
2. A substance through which impulses or impressions are transmitted.
3. Synonym(s): culture medium
4. The liquid holding a substance in solution or suspension.
5. Any of the substances in which a chromatographic or electrophoretic separation is effected.
[L. neuter of medius, middle]

medium

(mē′dē-əm)
n. pl. me·dia (-dē-ə) or me·diums
1. Something, such as an intermediate course of action, that occupies a position or represents a condition midway between extremes.
2. An intervening substance through which something else is transmitted or carried on.
3. pl. media
a. A surrounding environment in which something functions and thrives.
b. The substance in which a specific organism lives and thrives.
c. A culture medium.

medium

Imaging
A substance used to enhance imaging of a particular structure.
 
Informatics
A material on which data is stored.

Microbiology
A liquid or solid matrix with nutrient designed to support the growth of microorganisms.

Medium types (microbiology)
Differential medium
Often solid and contains various chemical and other substances, e.g., colourants that may be produced by certain microorganisms, aiding in their identification.

Enrichment medium
Often liquid and contains specific nutrients to give one or more of the microorganisms a growth advantage.
 
Selective medium
Those in which nutrients are added to either promote the growth of one or more group of bacteria, or inhibitors (e.g., nalidixic acid, malachite green and others) to slow the growth of certain bacteria, giving the desired organisms a “selective” growth advantage.
 
Molecular biology
A gel on which a reaction can occur.
 
Paranormal
Channeler, see there.

medium

Imaging A substance used to enhance imaging of a particular structure. See Contrast medium, High-osmolality contrast medium, Low-osmolality contrast medium, Informatics A material on which data is stored. See Magnetic medium, Multimedia, Output medium.

me·di·um

, pl. media (mē'dē-ŭm, -ă)
1. A means; that through which an action is performed.
2. A substance through which impulses or impressions are transmitted.
3. Synonym(s): culture medium.
4. The liquid holding a substance in solution or suspension.

medium

Any substance in which micro-organisms may be cultured in an incubator. Most culture media use AGAR jelly or gelatine containing additional materials such as blood or meat broth to encourage bacterial growth. Selective media contain substances that discourage the growth of unwanted organisms or specifically foster the growth of others.

medium

(pl. media) a substance on which microorganisms, other small organisms, cells and tissues can be cultured. A medium can be liquid or solid. If solid, it frequently contains AGAR, a stiffening agent extracted from seaweed. Culture media can contain all necessary nutrients and trace elements for normal growth (a minimal medium) but can also be supplemented. For example, ANTIBIOTICS can be added to test for antibiotic resistance in bacteria.

me·di·um

, pl. media (mē'dē-ŭm, -ă)
1. A means; that through or by which an action is performed.
2. Liquid holding another substance in solution or suspension.
References in periodicals archive ?
The mainstream view on the assumption that mediumistic phenomena are impossible often implies that Ochorowicz's principle of pursuing facts led him into the blind alley of being duped by fraud (Stachowski, Introduction, in Ochorowicz, 1916/1996, p.
The use of the sword as a prop in mediumistic trances can be found in both the north and northeast regions of Thailand.
As the present report concerns part of a work that had also focused on other peripheral correlates of mediumistic experiences (Bastos Jr.
"This first-ever neuroscientific evaluation of mediumistic trance states reveals some exciting data to improve our understanding of the mind and its relationship with the brain.
This new group of sitters was a good deal more skeptical of mediumistic phenomena than their predecessors.
In the process of seeking acceptance in the country, FEB shed its most controversial practices, the ones which uneducated healers practiced: mediumistic prescriptions and psychic/ mediumistic surgeries, the very practices that John of God engages in.
Along with religious and ethical components, New Thought contained mental-healing and mediumistic elements.
New societies for psychic research were established; numerous mediumistic seances took place; a theosophic society thrived; and Florentines saw the establishment of the Philosophical Library and an Italian version of the Christian Science Church.
Despite later accusations of using wires and regurgitation to create Eva C.'s "effects," many of the 225 photographs that accompany von Schrenck-Notzing's Phenomena of Materialization: A Contribution to the Investigation of Mediumistic Teleplastics (1920) remain seemingly inexplicable documentation of psychical occurrences.
Kontou only looks at No Name (1862)--perhaps a look at Poor Miss Finch (1872) might have led to different conclusions-and highlights how Magdalen Vanstone's performance on and off stage is rendered through mediumistic tropes, associating the sensation heroine with the spirit medium.
Everyone to a lesser or greater degree can increase their awareness on both a psychic level where you can pick up from the living and on a mediumistic level where you are aware of the spirit world.
Home seemed to reciprocate her interest: at one of his seances Elizabeth Barrett Browning was persuaded into a kind of flirtation with a ghost acting through the medium (Aveni 2001: 227)--accusations of morally dubious goings-on were commonly levelled at mediumistic practices.