Médecins sans Frontières

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Médecins sans Frontières

The world’s largest private medical disaster relief organisation, which provides medical assistance and humanitarian aid to refugee camps and victims of war, famine, natural disasters, and epidemics in the form of emergency medical care, immunisation and hygienic services, food and water, education, and training.

Médecins sans Frontières    
• Provides essential healthcare during and after conflict.
• Treats people affected by epidemic diseases.
• Helps people in the aftermath of natural disasters.
• Offers medical care to those excluded from healthcare.
• Rehabilitates hospitals and clinics.
• Runs vaccination programmes.
• Performs surgery.
• Operates feeding centres for malnourished children.
• Provides psychological support.
• Runs water and sanitation projects.
• Provides training to local personnel in remote healthcare centres and slum areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
The roof of a clinic constructed by Medicins Sans Frontiers (MSF) was reportedly blown off as iron sheets scattered, killing two and injuring others.
Medical charity Medicins Sans Frontiers has warned the world is running out of the most effective treatment against what?
Also included are Aktion Deutshland Hilft, AmeriCares, Asian Development Bank, Christian Blind Missions, Direct Relief, Entwicklungsbank, European Union Delegation, International Committee of Red Cross, International Medical Corps, Israel Forum for International Humanitarian Aid, Japan International Cooperation Agency, Korea International Cooperation Agency, Malteser International, Monaco Consulate, Project HOPE, Save the Children, Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation, UNICEF, UNFPA, USAID, WHO, Medicins Sans Frontiers in Belgium and in France, and Japan Overseas Medical Fund stationed in Medical Clinic, The Japanese Association Manila.
Accolades have been deservedly heaped on the Treatment Access Campaign, Medicins Sans Frontiers and Section 27 (then the AIDS Law Project), backed up by smaller and less vocal organisations such as the Southern African HIV Clinicians Society and the Rural Doctor Association.
Practical advice is interspersed with entertaining and edifying anecdotes from danger zone experts like Hoda Abdel Hamid and Jane Dutton Hamid of Al Jazeera, veteran journalists John Simpson and Jon Snow, and Samantha Bolton, formerly of Medicins Sans Frontiers.
This is not the first time that Talwar has lent a helping hand, since he is also a member of Medicins Sans Frontiers.