medicine wheel

(redirected from Medicine wheels)
Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

medicine wheel

A physical location, deemed sacred by Native Americans, which is constructed by laying stones in a particular pattern on the ground.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
Enlarge picture
MEDICINE WHEEL

medicine wheel

A symbol used by Native Americans to represent wholeness and balance. The medicine wheel consists of a circle with four quadrants representing spiritual, mental, physical, and emotional planes of existence.
See: illustration
See also: wheel
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of a specific medicine wheel to which one's life needs to be ordered may sound similar to tying problem solving to the four points of a Catholic cross.
The model uses the Eastern Cherokee, Ottawa, and Ojibwa medicine wheels (Coggins, 1990; Garrett 1990) to organize the four major themes that emerge from the life histories of the six women.
At one popular site, rangers dismantle medicine wheels at the rate of 20 a week.
Robinson of the Universityof South Florida in Tampa went back to a medicine wheel near Ft.
"I teach archaeology field schools in that area, so I'm friends with the district archaeologist for the Bureau of Land Management over there, and he's the one who first came across these medicine wheels and recognized what they are," O'Grady said.
During this time, he had a vision that he was at an ancient Medicine Wheel, and around it he saw all manner of animals.
For example, the author provides what is currently known about medicine wheels. These have been described, she says, as "death lodges, astronomical observatories, summer solstice calendars, boundary markers, and navigational aids." Yet no one know for sure.
* Explore thousands of years of prehistory, from an ancient bison kill site to a northern fishing camp to medicine wheels and a spectacular sun-dance ceremony, at the Provincial Museum of Alberta in Edmonton.
During filming, the Eh-Cho Dene woman, born in Fort Nelson, B.C., was introduced to the power of herbs, songs, dreams, ceremonies and medicine wheels for healing--alternatives that can work alongside conventional medicine.
"First Nations people have always used circles in their medicine wheels, sundance lodges, powwow arbors, fire pits, sweat lodges, tipis, pottery-making, basket-weaving and round dancing.