medical education

(redirected from Medicine studies)
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medical education

The provision of instruction and information in the sciences basic to medicine and in clinical practice, ideally in such a manner as to inculcate in the recipient the desire to continue the process, spontaneously, throughout life. Literally, a ‘drawing out’. The importance of medical education is highlighted by the recent decision of the General Medical Council to issue licences to practice only to doctors whose knowledge and skills have been validated and shown to conform to the standards laid down in the GMC pamphlet GOOD MEDICAL PRACTICE. This applies to all doctors from 2005. John Locke insisted that the aims of education, in order of importance, were virtue, wisdom, breeding and learning. There is much to be said for this view.
References in periodicals archive ?
Muir, who will represent Glasgow Uni, perhaps for the last time as she nears the conclusion of her veterinary medicine studies, said: "I always like to race in Scotland if and when I am able to fit it into other competition plans.
Researchers reviewed randomized, controlled traditional Chinese medicine studies taking place over the past 10 years.
No longer saddled by these problems, scientists have used this approach to achieve better results in areas ranging from synthetic biology to individualized medicine studies based on patient cell screening to broad-scale drug discovery work.
Regenerative medicine studies indicate how to replace or regenerate cells, tissues and organs that have been damaged by chronic disease.
This textbook offers synopses of one hundred important emergency medicine studies.
Qarabadin-e-salehi] Tehran: Iran University of Medical Sciences, Institute of history of Medicine studies and Islamic medicine.
Finn, a principal investigator, said that the magnitude of benefit they are seeing is not something commonly seen in cancer medicine studies.
The system will be used for all nuclear medicine studies at the Department of Radiology at LandspE[degrees]tali University Hospital at the Hringbraut Campus in Reykjavik, Iceland.
In this jointly published editorial, we wish to focus on the first step toward that goal, that of full disclosure in industry-sponsored laboratory medicine studies.
The Food and Drug Administration has launched an initiative to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure from three types of medical imaging procedures: computed tomography, nuclear medicine studies, and fluoroscopy.