aloe

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aloe

 [al´o]
1. a succulent plant, of the genus Aloe.
2. the dried juice of leaves of various species of Aloe, used in various dermatologic and cosmetic preparations.

al·oe

(al'ō), The genus name Aloe is pronounced al'ō-ē.
1. The dried juice from the leaves of plants of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), from which are derived aloin, resin, emodin, and volatile oils.
2. The dried juice from the leaves of Aloe perryi (socotrine aloes), of Aloe barbadensis (Barbados and Curaçao aloes), or of Aloe capensis (Cape aloes); used as a purgative; used topically in cosmetics where it has unproven value.

aloe

/al·oe/ (al´o)
1. a succulent plant, of the genus Aloe.
2. the dried juice of leaves of various species of Aloe, used in various dermatologic and cosmetic preparations.aloet´ic

aloe

(ăl′ō)
n.
1. Any of various chiefly African plants of the genus Aloe, having rosettes of succulent, often spiny-margined leaves and long stalks bearing yellow, orange, or red tubular flowers.
2. See aloe vera.
3. aloes(used with a sing. verb)
a. A laxative drug obtained from the processed juice of certain species of aloe. Also called bitter aloes.
b. See aloeswood.

al′o·et′ic (ăl′ō-ĕt′ĭk) adj.

aloe

a succulent found throughout the world.
uses Aloe vera gel is used externally for minor burns, skin irritations, minor wounds, frostbite, and radiation-induced injuries. Internally, it is used to heal intestinal inflammation and ulcers and to stimulate bile secretion as a digestive aid.
contraindications Hypersensitivity to this plant, garlic, onions, or tulips prohibits the topical use of aloe. Aloe also should not be used on deep wounds. Internal use of the dried juice is contraindicated during pregnancy and lactation, in children younger than 12 years of age, and in those with kidney or cardiac disease or bowel obstruction. This product should not be used long term.

Aloe vera

A stemless plant of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), which has succulent leaves and grows in subtropical and tropical zones; aloe juice is rich in aloin, resin, emodin and volatile oils, and has a wide range of therapeutic uses.

Chinese herbal medicine
A vera is used topically for acne, athlete’s foot, burns, hemorrhoids, insect bites, premature balding, psoriasis and sunburns.

Fringe medicine
Aloe essence is said to balance and centre creative and vital life activities.
 
Herbal medicine
Aloe is used in Western herbal medicine for indications similar to that of Chinese herbal medicine.

Mainstream medicine
Aloe has been used in conventional medicine topically to manage radiation-therapy-induced burns.

Toxicity
Aloe should not be taken internally as it is a potent laxative; A vera extract has been known to be administered internally for constipation, dermatitis, gastritis, headaches, hepatitis, hypertension, hypotension, intestinal parasites and vertigo.

al·oe

(al'ō)
The dried juice from the leaves of Aloe perryi, and A. barbadensis or of A. capensis; used as a purgative and topically in cosmetics where it has unproven value.

aloe,

n Latin names:
Aloe vera L.,
Aloe perryi, Aloe barbadensis Miller,
Aloe ferox, Aloe spicata; parts used: leaves, secretory cells; uses: laxative, minor burns, sunburn, cuts, acne, stomatitis, (dried aloe juice currently under research: diabetes, HIV, cancer, ulcers, colon disease, bleeding, asthma, cold); precautions: (dried aloe juice) pregnancy; lactation; children younger than age 12; patients with renal disease, heart disease, or stomach blockage; not to be used topically by those hypersensitive to garlic, onions, or tulips; not for deep lacerations; can cause irreversible intestinal lining damage, hemorrhagic diarrhea, red urine, nephrotoxicity, contact dermatitis. Also called
Barbados, aloe, burn plant, Cape aloe, Curacao aloe, elephant's gall, hsiang-dan, lily of the desert, lu-hai, socotrine aloe, Venezuela aloe, and
Zanzibar aloe.
Enlarge picture
Aloe.

al·oe

(al'ō)
The dried juice from the leaves of plants of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), from which are derived aloin, resin, emodin, and volatile oils.

aloe

the dried juice of plants of the genus Aloe of the Liliaceae family. It is an anthraquinone cathartic and was at one time the favored purgative for horses. Called also aloes. The name aloe is also used to refer to the fragrant wood of the tree Aquilaria agallocha.

aloe vera
a mucinous substance obtained from the leaves of the plant, Aloe vera. Various therapeutic properties are claimed, including antibacterial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory activity. It is often used on burns.
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