functional food

(redirected from Medicinal food)
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functional food

a food purported or proven to have a beneficial health effect.
See also: designer food, phytochemicals, biochemopreventives, nutraceutical.

functional food

A natural or processed food that contains known biologically active compounds which, when in defined quantitative and qualitative amounts, provides a clinically proven health benefit, and thus is useful in preventing, managing and treating chronic diseases.

func·tion·al food

(fŭngk'shŭn-ăl fūd)
Foodstuff demonstrated to confer physiologic benefits, reduce the risk of chronic disease, or act as a nutrient.
Compare: nutraceutical

functional food

1. Food products with additives for which, following FDA approval, health claims can be made.
2. A food that has a defined health benefit for the person who consumes it.
See also: food
References in periodicals archive ?
All you need to do is take advantage of the powerful medicinal foods that nature has to offer.
This study, published in Journal of Medicinal Food, focused on ovariectomized rats, which experience similar drops in estrogen levels to those women experience as they age.
According to a 2012 study published in The Journal of Medicinal Food, green tea can help you do just that.
Others address the evaluation of natural products against biofilm-mediated bacterial resistance; the clinical effects of caraway; challenges in identifying potential phytotherapies from contemporary biomedical literature; botanicals as medicinal food and their effects against obesity; applications of high-performance liquid chromatography in the analysis of herbal products; the use of Ayurveda in developing safe and effective treatment choices; the discovery and development of lead compounds from natural sources using computational approaches; infrared spectroscopic technologies for quality control; the extraction, isolation, identification, and bioassay of antimicrobial secondary metabolites; and data on the uses of herbal medicines in cardiac diseases.
In a review of studies on nutrition and celiac disease published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, researchers said that a gluten-free diet "seems to increase the risk of overweight or obesity.'' The authors attributed that to the tendency for gluten-free foods to have more calories, sugars and fat than their regular counterparts.
The consequence would likely be on the understory medicinal plants which may result in challenges for the security of medicinal food in the world's poorest areas.Therefore cultivation of medicinal plants would be a good strategy to face such challenges.Cultivation of medicinal plants has shown encouraging results in this study.
In the Journal of Medicinal Food (2007), he reported some of his preliminary findings about the food, concluding that "Hull blackberry extract (HBE) has potent antioxidant, antiproliferative, and anti-inflammatory activities and that HBE-formulated products may have the potential for the treatment and/ or prevention of cancer and/or other inflammatory diseases."
The research has been published in the Journal of Medicinal Food. ( ANI )
Mushrooms can be considered a functional food (medicinal food or nutritional food) in this way, such functional or medical foods should not claim to cure disease, but there are an increasing number of scientific studies that strongly support some functional foods such as mushrooms having a role in disease prevention and in some cases of bringing about suppression or remission of a diseased state.
(drumstick) against antitubercular drugs induced lipid peroxidation in rats," Journal of Medicinal Food, vol.
It plays a critical role in the production of insulin, thereby promoting blood sugar control, says another study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The seeds contain ' plant- insulin' peptides resembling insulin that also work like natural insulin secreted from the human pancreatic glands.