Medicare cut

Medicare cut

A popular term for a reduction in Medicare’s reimbursement paid to physician providers.

The 2003 Medicare cuts ranged from 3% for family practitioners to 5% for allergists, gastroenterologists and general surgeons.
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In the new crackdown, Medicare cut off payments to the Scooter Store, which resulted in the company's going out of business.
The 5% Medicare cut implemented in 2013 (a combination of health reform cuts and sequestration) is already having immense consequences for smaller labs with these kinds of margins.
Nevertheless, using the annual arbitrary Medicare cut in this deteriorating situation has not only been unsuccessful politically--the SGR also fails to target only the areas mainly responsible for increases in billing.
The president says that seniors will not have their Medicare cut. No, the doctors who provide health services to seniors will have their reimbursement cut 10 percent.
The Medicare cut will impact physicians, hospitals, other health care providers, health plans, and prescription drug plans but will not directly impact beneficiaries.
The infamous 11.1 percent Medicare cut enacted this past fall, which for some of these organizations is closer to 15 percent, is taking its toll as much on family-owned facilities as any.
Imagine a senior citizen watching the news: A Medicare cut? Jesus, they're beating up on the elderly!
Also, shifting eligible retirees to Medicare cut Worcester's long-term liability from an estimated $1.2 billion as of 2004 to the current estimate of $656 million.
Medicare cut practice reimbursement in 2003 for the second year.
Arkansas hospitals were bracing for $42.6 million in lost revenue during 2013 alone from the 2 percent Medicare cut. Over 10 years, lost revenue from the deficit-reducing gambit was projected to top $407 million for the state's roster of hospitals.
On January 1, Medicare cut physician fees across the board by 5.4 percent
David Peknay, an S&P director on corporate healthcare ratings, said the agency anticipates the Medicare cut could reduce nursing home EBITDA by 30 percent and 60 percent "depending on the company and many other factors."

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