subspecialty

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subspecialty

(sŭb′spĕsh′əl-tē)
n. pl. subspecial·ties
A narrow field of study or work within a specialty, as pediatric dermatology or geriatric psychiatry.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

subspecialty

Medtalk A field of health care expertise requiring 1–2 yrs of post-residency training or fellowship in a recognized program, which often has a closure examination. See Fellowship. Cf Specialty.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This program is not only available in our emergency department but also available in our medical subspecialty and dental clinics during weekday hours.
A business model for medical subspecialty training in South Africa.
A Neuropsychiatry is a medical subspecialty focusing on the complex relationship between brain function and behavior.
A field dm could use some doctor shopping: Can addiction be a viable medical subspecialty: Addiction Professional 2005;3:16-22.
Palliative care is the newest medical subspecialty, having been granted that status by the American Board of Medical Specialties in 2006.
It took the ABHPM 10 years to persuade the ABMS to recognize hospice and palliative medicine as a medical subspecialty, Dr.
For one year, January 8, 2003 through January 7, 2004, we evaluated usage by primary care and medical subspecialty providers.
Research in biomedical informatics or bioinformatics often employs a specific scientific discipline or medical subspecialty as the subject field or domain in which the research is undertaken, or in which tools and ideas are applied.
While all veterans require convenient access to primary care, medical subspecialty care, mental-health services, and long-term care, female veterans have special needs that include access to gynecology and reproductive health services.
As the authors state from the outset, this is not a chronological account, but instead a compendium of chapters divided by medical subspecialty. Rather than offering a narrative of the hospital as a whole, the authors' explicit purpose is to document the scientific evolution of the departments of cardiology, geriatrics, radiation oncology, and many others.
The meeting was sponsored by the American Gastroenterological Association and three other medical subspecialty groups.

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