medical history

(redirected from Medical historian)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Medical historian: medical history, Medical anthropologist

history

 [his´to-re]
a systematic account of events.
case history see case history.
health history a holistic assessment of all factors affecting a patient's health status, including information about social, cultural, familial, and economic aspects of the patient's life as well as any other component of the patient's life style that affects health and well-being. The health history is designed to assess the effects of health care deviations on the patient and the family, to evaluate teaching needs, and to serve as the basis of an individualized plan for addressing wellness.
medical history information obtained from the patient to aid in establishing a medical diagnosis and developing a treatment plan.
nursing history a written record providing data for assessing the nursing care needs of a patient.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

medical history

a narrative or record of past events and circumstances that are or may be relevant to a patient's current state of health. Informally, an account of past diseases, injuries, treatments, and other strictly medical facts. More formally, a comprehensive statement of facts pertaining to past and present health gathered, ideally from the patient, by directed questioning and organized under the following heads. Chief Complaint (CC): a brief statement of the complaint or incident that prompted medical consultation. History of Present Illness (HPI): a detailed chronologic narrative, as much as possible in the patient's own words, of the development of the current health problem from its onset to the present. Past Medical History (PMH): prior illnesses, their treatments and sequelae. Social History (SH): marital status, past and present occupations, travel, hobbies, stresses, diet, habits, and use of tobacco, alcohol, or drugs. Family History (FH); present health or cause of death of parents, brothers, sisters, with particular attention to hereditary disorders. Review of Systems (ROS): an exhaustive survey of symptoms or diseases, organized by body system, not covered in previous parts of the history.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

medical history

(1) History of medicine, see there.
(2) The part of a patient's life history that is important in determining the risk factors for, diagnosing, and treating a disorder, as in a history of exposure, symptoms, occupational, exposure to causative agents linked to a particular condition, physical trauma, infection or cancer.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

medical history

Clinical medicine The part of a Pt's life Hx important for determining the risk factors for, diagnosing, and treating a disorder–eg, history of exposure, Sx, occupational, exposure to causative agents linked to a particular condition, infection or cancer Vox populi → medtalk Anamnesis
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Fortuine (pronounced Four-TYNE) is Alaska's pre-eminent medical historian. As we expected, this fact-filled book is thoroughly researched and meticulously documented.
Family and friends need to provide and review information about a patient's health, often serving as both a patient's medical historian and caregiver.
Bullough is a medical historian who specializes in the
But this brilliant medical historian went a step further.
The British medical historian Roy Porter is quoted in The New York Times, "Nowadays, with the genome project, people might say that all diseases have a genetic basis.
By contrast, a fellow researcher -- a medical historian -- picks up each letter, places his nose close to each page and -- much to Duguid's alarm -- inhales deeply.
But it was also because physicians "jealously guarded" their own history, in the words of American medical historian Charles Rosenberg.
Marmor, a Yale-based advocate of universal health insurance (and occasional writer for this magazine), and the distinguished medical historian Kenneth M.
Medical historian Edward Shorter of the University of Toronto calls related cases of psychosomatic illness "epidemic hysteria." As a historian, he finds the GWS phenomenon tragic yet "fascinating." Says Shorter, "Just as cholera is spread by water droplets, epidemic hysteria is spread by the media."
Byline: Medical historian and author of new thriller Beloved Poison E.S THOMSON
While there are several stories regarding the origin of mermaids, Medical historian Lindsey Fitzharris, who has a PhD from Oxford University, told (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2767720/The-real-life-mermaids-Fatal-medical-condition-legs-fuse-womb-idea-mythical-creature-originated-says-expert.html) MailOnline that the concept of the half human half fish creature could have emerged from a medical condition.
A medical historian has analyzed letters between the two, complete with food diaries and daily weigh-ins surely recognizable to many of today's dieters.

Full browser ?