quackery

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quackery

 [kwak´er-e]
the practice or methods of a quack.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

char·la·tan·ism

(shar'lă-tan-izm),
A fraudulent claim to medical knowledge; treating the sick without knowledge of medicine or authority to practice medicine.
Synonym(s): quackery
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
False representation of a substance, device or therapeutic system as being beneficial in treating a medical condition, diagnosing a disease, or maintaining a state of health—e.g., 'snake oil' remedies; deliberate misrepresentation of the ability of a substance or device to prevent or treat disease
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

quackery

Bogus therapy Health fraud False representation of a substance, device or therapeutic system as being beneficial in treating a medical condition–eg, 'snake oil' remedies, diagnosing a disease, or maintaining a state of health; eliberate misrepresentation of the ability of a substance or device to prevent or treat disease. See AIDS fraud, AIDS quackery, Health fraud, Pseudovitamin, 'Snake oil' remedy, Unproven methods of cancer management. Cf Alternative medicine, Fraud.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

char·la·tan·ism

(shahr'lă-tăn-izm)
A fraudulent claim to medical knowledge; treating the sick without knowledge of medicine or authority to practice medicine.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Insurers are still looking to technology in the effort to combat medical fraud, and the results for the most part have been mixed.
When the going gets tough, when the budget projections look bad and election time turns up the political pressure, lawmakers and regulators who oversee health care programs can be counted to do at least one thing: get tough on medical fraud and abuse.
health care, forms of medical fraud and abuse undoubtedly will alter.
Furthermore, the state units only patrol the Medicaid system; at the federal level, at least nine agencies have some responsibility for investigating medical fraud, with the task falling mostly on the FBI and the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) of the Department of Health and Human Services, where the story is different but no more encouraging.
It serves to protect American citizens not only from exposure to unacceptably toxic agents, but also from economic and medical fraud resulting from the sale of unproven remedies.
The committee also discussed preparations to hold an international conference to combat medical fraud during the first quarter of 2019, sponsored by the Ministry of Health, with the participation of world organisations concerned with pharmaceutical fraud, World Health Organisation, United Nations, and federal and local authorities in the country.
The education sessions centered on questionable wildfire claims, medical fraud, investigating fraud rings and auto fires to name a few.
The NICB and CAIF are also part of the national public-private Healthcare Fraud Prevention Partnership (HFPP) launched in 2012 by the Obama administration and the Department of Health & Human Services, which shares information with the government and private insurers about medical fraud. "Fraudsters know who does what and how to work the system," says Morris.
Assemblyman Morelle said, "I think the DFS is trying to determine whether it can identify some of the culprits of medical fraud. But obviously we have been working with our counterparts in the Senate, with insurance carriers, with the doctors, and with the Trial Bar to try to identify solutions to what has been a vexing issue of not only allegations of fraud in the system, but also high premiums, particularly in certain boroughs of the state."
Medicare officials have launched a 2-year demonstration project aimed at preventing infusion fraud schemes in South Florida, where medical fraud has been on the rise.

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