medical student debt

(redirected from Medical School Debt)
The amount of financial obligations or monies owed—with accruing interest—to various parties by a medical student, usually understood to mean at the time of graduation from medical school

medical student debt

The amount of financial obligations or monies owed with (accruing) interest to various parties by a medical student
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in addition, the foundation will retire up to $100,000 of outstanding medical school debt owed by the grant recipient.
Newly minted primary care physicians end up with more than $300,000 in medical school debt following graduation.
Even though physicians on average earn $300,000 annually, based on Fidelity's business data, industry research showed that 84% carried medical school debt averaging more than $176,000.
However, the massive burden of medical school debt will continue to crush the entrepreneurial spirit of even the most idealistic young graduates, and I don't foresee a time when the majority of physicians will again own their practices.
Physicians are expensive to train, hire and retain, and the median medical school debt now stands at $170,000.
A Connecticut resident, Elizabeth Gott, said last week she decided to sell the ball on behalf of her 30-year-old son, Michael, so he could use the proceeds to pay off his medical school debt.
I RECENTLY READ A STORY ABOUT A family whose son is struggling to pay off nearly $200,000 in medical school debt.
More than 100 Texas doctors made a deal with the state: For four years, they would practice in underserved communities and treat the neediest patients - in return for having their medical school debt forgiven.
They also needed help in paying off medical school debt and hoped to practice in a fairly modern clinic where they could do a full spectrum of family medicine, including operative obstetrics.
A little over a quarter of residents surveyed by AAFP said that their level of medical school debt influenced their choice of practice arrangement.
Young doctors saddled with medical school debt are more often drawn to such lucrative specialties as radiology or anesthesiology in big cities or suburban areas, where they can earn double the $120,000 to $140,000 salary of a rural family practitioner.
We support the effort to increase training of primary care physicians and the recognition that medical school debt relief is critically needed.

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