Medicaid buy-in

Medicaid buy-in

A proposed system that would have allowed those not eligible for Medicaid coverage to enroll by paying premiums on a sliding scale, based on their income.

Although the concept was supported by the American Medical Association, critics believed it was doomed to failure in that there are few inclined to buy into a program stigmatised as “welfare” in nature. Medicaid buy-in ultimately failed.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Medicaid buy-in

Managed care A proposed system to allow those who are not eligible for Medicaid coverage to enroll by paying premiums on a sliding scale
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For purposes of our discussion, a "Medicaid buy-in" is any initiative that uses part of the structure of the Medicaid program to open coverage, for a fee, to populations not usually eligible for Medicaid.
One answer is sure, lowering the Medicare eligibility age to 55 (or even lower) is an excellent idea, but since it will not happen without Democratic control of the White House and Congress, why not encourage states to adopt a Medicaid buy-in right now?
An optional Medicaid coverage category, called the Medicaid Buy-In for working adults, allows adults with disabilities to retain their Medicaid coverage even when their earnings rise above their state's Medicaid income eligibility threshold.
Forty-four states have opted for one creative solution known as a "Medicaid Buy-In." This program rewards work by making workers with disabilities eligible for Medicaid--a health insurance program jointly funded by federal and state governments--for a modest premium.
States may require that working individuals with disabilities "buy in" to the program by sharing in the costs of their coverage--thus, these states' programs are referred to as a Medicaid Buy-In. The act also required that GAO report on states' progress in designing and implementing the Medicaid Buy-In.
This new legislation will allow people with disabilities to retain their Medicare benefits longer than in the past and will remove the limits on the Medicaid buy-in option for workers with disabilities.
Under the proposed legislation, states would have the option to establish a Medicaid buy-in program to enable workers with disabilities to purchase Medicaid coverage.
One out of eight female enrollees was a Medicaid buy-in. This reflects the greater longevity of women, their greater risk of nursing home stays, and the fact that they often incur high health care expenditures that result in the depletion of their assets.
The Center for Workers with Disabilities has released a report on Community Integration for People with Disabilities: The Role of Long-Term Care and the Medicaid Buy-In. The paper provides individuals working in Medicaid or disability employment with an understanding of some of the essential components of Medicaid long-term care programs, describes rebalancing efforts, and presents examples of how states are incorporating employment into long-term care services and supports.
While SSDI recipients have the benefit of the extended free Part A Medicare coverage under TTWWIIA, gaps in coverage remain that can only be filled by state-optional Medicaid buy-ins. Just over a dozen states have taken steps toward implementing a Medicaid buy-in.
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