Medicaid


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Related to Medicaid: Medicare

Medicaid

 [med´ĭ-kād]
a state-operated program providing medical care to certain low-income persons; the state programs receive federal aid and are subject to federal guidelines.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Medicaid

also

medicaid

(mĕd′ĭ-kād′)
n.
A program in the United States, jointly funded by the states and the federal government, that reimburses hospitals and physicians for providing care to qualifying people who cannot finance their own medical expenses.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Medicaid

A US federally funded, state-operated and -administered program authorised by Title XIX of the Social Security Act of 1965 (42 USC§1396 et sequens), which provides medical assistance to low-income groups, such the elderly, blind, disabled, single-parent families and unemployed under age 65.

Medicaid provides health services for those with income sufficient for basic needs, but not for medical care; it currently costs 2% of the US GDP. 43 million Americans were enrolled in 2004 at a cost of ± $295 bn.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Medicaid

Medical practice A federally-funded, state-operated and administered program authorized by Title XIX of the Social Security Act of 1965, which provides medical assistance to low-income groups–eg, elderly, blind, disabled, single-parent families, unemployed under age 65. See HMO.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Med·i·caid

(medi-kād)
A nationwide health insurance program in the U.S. that provides coverage to qualified low-income citizens and qualified legal residents; funded jointly by the state and federal governments, the program has federal guidelines that give the individual states wide discretion to determine eligibility and to set benefits; established in 1965 by an amendment to the Social Security Act.
Compare: Medicare (1)
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Med·i·caid

(medi-kād)
A nationwide health insurance program in the U.S. that provides coverage to qualified low-income citizens and qualified legal residents; funded jointly by the state and federal governments, the program has federal guidelines that give the individual states wide discretion to determine eligibility and to set benefits.
Compare: Medicare (1)
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
While the majority of studies examining changes in Medicaid fee rates focus on access to care for Medicaid beneficiaries, a relatively small number of studies have examined effects on utilization of services for adult Medicaid beneficiaries (Shen and Zuckerman 2005; Atherly and Mortensen 2014; Gangopadhyaya, Long, and Kaestner unpublished data).
Less clear is the relationship between Medicaid fee increases and out-of-pocket expenditures on health care services for Medicaid enrollees.
CHIP covers fewer children than Medicaid in Florida and nationwide.
When asked about the in-person and custom courses that built the Mostly Medicaid brand, Farris assured us they will continue.
About half of states have programs that expand eligibility for family planning services to individuals otherwise ineligible for Medicaid. (9) These Medicaid family planning expansions were pioneered by states in the mid-1990s as "waiver" programs--experiments that required special
Before the new Medicaid eligibility rules took effect, the divorce rate for people ages 50 to 64 was lower in the "control group" states than in the states that ended up expanding Medicaid.
"Medicaid has broad waiver authority to allow any sort of experimental programs in the states where it's happening, and most of the states that have joined in the last six to 12 months have used waivers.
Medicaid may cover groups such as children, the elderly, or persons with disabilities who have too much income to meet financial eligibility (above 185 percent of the FPL), but who incur large medical or long-term care expenses and can qualify for Medicaid by "spending down," i.e., reducing their income through medical expenses.
Another fallacy is that Medicaid could keep people healthier by preventing disease.
Two-thirds of the uninsured population in states planning to expand Medicaid will receive health insurance help from Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program, or federal exchange subsidies, compared with only 38% of uninsured people in states opting out of the Medicaid expansion, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation report found.
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) provided for significant increases in Medicaid fees for primary care services--up to 100 percent of Medicare fees for 2013 and 2014--to encourage increased Medicaid participation among primary care physicians (PCPs).