Medicaid


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Related to Medicaid: Medicare

Medicaid

 [med´ĭ-kād]
a state-operated program providing medical care to certain low-income persons; the state programs receive federal aid and are subject to federal guidelines.

Medicaid

also

medicaid

(mĕd′ĭ-kād′)
n.
A program in the United States, jointly funded by the states and the federal government, that reimburses hospitals and physicians for providing care to qualifying people who cannot finance their own medical expenses.

Medicaid

[med′ikād]
a U.S. federally funded state-operated program of medical assistance to people with low incomes, authorized by Title XIX of the Social Security Act. Under broad federal guidelines, the individual states determine benefits, eligibility, rates of payment, and methods of administration.

Medicaid

A US federally funded, state-operated and -administered program authorised by Title XIX of the Social Security Act of 1965 (42 USC§1396 et sequens), which provides medical assistance to low-income groups, such the elderly, blind, disabled, single-parent families and unemployed under age 65.

Medicaid provides health services for those with income sufficient for basic needs, but not for medical care; it currently costs 2% of the US GDP. 43 million Americans were enrolled in 2004 at a cost of ± $295 bn.

Medicaid

Medical practice A federally-funded, state-operated and administered program authorized by Title XIX of the Social Security Act of 1965, which provides medical assistance to low-income groups–eg, elderly, blind, disabled, single-parent families, unemployed under age 65. See HMO.

Med·i·caid

(medi-kād)
A nationwide health insurance program in the U.S. that provides coverage to qualified low-income citizens and qualified legal residents; funded jointly by the state and federal governments, the program has federal guidelines that give the individual states wide discretion to determine eligibility and to set benefits; established in 1965 by an amendment to the Social Security Act.
Compare: Medicare (1)

Med·i·caid

(medi-kād)
A nationwide health insurance program in the U.S. that provides coverage to qualified low-income citizens and qualified legal residents; funded jointly by the state and federal governments, the program has federal guidelines that give the individual states wide discretion to determine eligibility and to set benefits.
Compare: Medicare (1)

Medicaid,

n.pr a federal assistance program established as Title XIX under the Social Security Amendments, which provides payment for medical care for certain low-income individuals and families. The program is funded jointly by the state and federal governments and administered by the states.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Michigan Medicaid program established its supplemental rebate program through a state plan amendment approved by CMS.
But since children are much more likely to be covered by Medicaid and state health programs, pediatricians may find themselves with little ability to opt out of providing such care.
Nonetheless, the findings suggest that health care providers "should have a high index of suspicion" when a female Medicaid recipient younger than 16 presents for reproductive health services.
The law also requires CMS to add 100 full-time equivalent employees to work with states in support of their Medicaid program integrity efforts.
As noted in a Heritage Foundation report: "Medicaid's reimbursement rates have dipped so low and its bureaucracy has become so burdensome that many providers, especially physicians, have been forced to stop accepting Medicaid payments.
In practice, this emergency program may only work for patients who already have a Medicaid card--otherwise it is likely to be logistically impossible, given all the difficulties in the current program.
The program now pays for two-thirds of all nursing home residents, nearly half of all births in many states, and the health care expenses of about a quarter of all children under the age of 5,with no real evidence that the health care outcomes are significantly better or that Medicaid expansion has had the net effect of reducing the ranks of the uninsured.
However, the true value of exempt property is reduced by the real possibility of collection by the state from a Medicaid recipient's estate.
TWWIIA (pronounced twee-ah) makes it easier to keep or to get Medicare or Medicaid.
For those who use formal long-term care supports, the federal/state Medicaid program is the primary public payer, covering 31 percent of long-term care expenditures.
A poor family, the Duggers sought public assistance from Medicaid to pay for Margaret's long-term care.
For example, public funded medical providers such as Medicare, Medicaid, and worker's compensation are increasingly being privatized through contractual agreements between the states and health care providers (Hagglund & Frank, 1996).