median nerve

(redirected from Median neuropathy)

me·di·an nerve

[TA]
formed by the union of medial and lateral roots from the medial and lateral cords of the brachial plexus, respectively; it supplies all the muscles in the anterior compartment of the forearm with the exception of the flexor carpi ulnaris and ulnar half of the flexor digitorum profundus; it passes through the carpal tunnel to supply the thenar muscles (except adductor pollicis and the deep head of flexor pollicis brevis) via its recurrent thenar branch; its sensory fibers are distributed to the skin of the palmar and distal dorsal aspects of the radial three-and-a-half digits and adjacent palm. The median nerve is most commonly injured through compression in carpal tunnel syndrome, resulting in a loss of ability to oppose the thumb (thus creating "ape hand") and loss of sensation over the radial portion of the hand.
Synonym(s): nervus medianus [TA]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

median nerve

A primarily sensory nerve of the arm, located at the medial and lateral cords of the brachial plexus at C6–T1 of the brachial plexus.

Route
Deep within the medial bicipital furrow to the cubital fossa, passing between the two heads of the pronator teres, then descending deep to the superficial flexor of the digits and flexor retinaculum.

Branches, forearm
• Anterior interosseous branch.
• Palmar cutaneous branch.
 
Branches, hand
• Recurrent branch to muscles of the thenar compartment, which innervates the flexor pollicis bevis, abductor pollicis brevis and opponens pollicis.
• Digital cutaneous branches, which supply the:
   – Lateral (radial) three and a half digits on palmar side;
   – Index, middle and ring finger on dorsum of hand.
• Motor innervation to the first and second lumbricals of hand.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·di·an nerve

(mē'dē-ăn nĕrv) [TA]
Formed by the union of medial and lateral roots from the medial and lateral cords of the brachial plexus, respectively; it supplies all the muscles in the anterior compartment of the forearm with the exception of the flexor carpi ulnaris and ulnar half of the flexor digitorum profundus; it passes through the carpal tunnel to supply the thenar muscles (except adductor pollicis and the deep head of flexor pollicis brevis) via its recurrent thenar branch; its sensory fibers are distributed to the skin of the palmar and distal dorsal aspects of the radial three-and-a-half digits andadjacent palm. The median nerve is most commonly injured through compression in carpal tunnel syndrome, resulting in a loss of ability to oppose the thumb (thus creating "ape hand") and loss of sensation over the radial portion of the hand.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

median nerve

One of the two major nerves of the arm, supplying most of the muscles and providing sensation in the two-thirds of the hand on the thumb side.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Median nerve

A nerve which runs through the wrist and into the hand. It provides sensation and some movement to the hand, the thumb, the index finger, the middle finger, and half of the ring finger.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·di·an nerve

(mē'dē-ăn nĕrv) [TA]
Formed by the union of medial and lateral roots from the medial and lateral cords of the brachial plexus, respectively; it supplies all the muscles in the anterior compartment of the forearm with the exception of the flexor carpi ulnaris and ulnar half of the flexor digitorum profundus.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
discovered asymptomatic median neuropathy in 28% of their study population.
Though the symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome had been known as back as in mid-1800s, the definite description of the condition could only be done after World War II.PI Learmonth in 1933 described two cases he operated in 1929, in which he divided flexor retinaculum for median neuropathy. [4] Later in 1946, Cannon and Love published 38 cases of distal median neuropathy treated by surgical division of flexor retinaculum.
The study analyzed the prevalence of median neuropathy detected by NCS testing, with regard to preventive measures being introduced, in the period from the initiation of production in January 2008 until the end of 2014 in automotive assembly workers.
However, the limited results available were suggestive of a severe proximal median neuropathy, as well as findings suggestive of a possible C8 radiculopathy, likely related to the history of prior ulnar nerve dysfunction.
Pronator syndrome (PS) is a proximal median neuropathy that may present in isolation or in combination with CTS as a double crush syndrome.
Clinical examination methods bear subjective properties, neurological symptoms of CTS are not specific to the median neuropathy occurring in wrist but might develop in proximal median neuropathy or polyneuropathy resulting from pronator or anterior interosseous syndromes, thoracic outlet syndrome and cervical radiculopathy and especially the sensitivity of the electrodiagnostic studies are not complete.
Carpal tunnel syndrome is an entrapment median neuropathy causing pain, paresthesia, numbness, and other symptoms in the distribution of the median nerve due to its compression at the wrist in the carpal tunnel.
Median neuropathy at or distal to the wrist or carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of a number of muscle-, tendon-, and nerve-related disorders that affect people performing intensive work with their hands.
A neurophysiologic examination demonstrated a mild improvement in distal median neuropathy. Results of serologic assessment for rheumatoid factor and antibodies against cycliccitrullinated peptide were negative.
Median neuropathy. In: Electromyography and neuromuscular disorders: Clinical-electrophysiologic correlations.
Late median neuropathy is defined as developing after the fracture has healed, and its occurrence has been reported in literature from 0.5% to 22%.