medallion

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medallion

A popular term for a circumscribed, several-cm-in-greatest-dimension, red scaly patch seen in patients with pityriasis rosea, in which the scales are detached from the skin surface at the centre of the lesion.
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3, the SFMTA's board of directors gave final approval for the launch of a short-term pilot program for the buying and selling of San Francisco taxi medallions. This allows medallion holders who are older than 70 or disabled to sell their medallions to new qualified drivers.
22 court filing, BFCU said it is seeking judgement against the cab companies and the "immediate possession" of their medallions, which "could conceivably have" an effect on their bankruptcy estates.
According to S&P Capital IQ report, in the pre-Uber peak, financial institutions, most notably banks and credit unions, would lend up to 90 percent of the value of a taxi medallion. At the time, such loans were considered low risk, particularly because the taxi medallion industry had the equivalent of a regulated monopoly, with limited supply and minimal threat of competition.
If using wider lace to create a larger medallion, additional yardage is required.
Petal author, Vaughn Wilson, took top honors at the Will Rogers Medallion Award ceremony in Fort Worth, Texas.
Beaded medallions can be constructed in at least two different ways.
All the profits from the sale of the Medallions will be donated to British Olympic Association (Company Number: 01576093) and British Paralympic Association (Company Number: 02370578 and a registered charity (Charity No 802385)) such profits being split 83% and 17% respectively.
If you're not one of our lucky winners you can still be a part of the celebrations by collecting the medallions, which are exclusively available at BP forecourts with a new medallion revealed every Wednesday for 12 weeks.
SHOWN here are two pieces of 19th century Chinese porcelain decorated in an instantly recognisable pattern known as rose medallion.
Opposition to taxi medallions unites liberal and conservative policy groups.