mechanoreceptor

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mechanoreceptor

 [mek″ah-no-re-sep´ter]
a nerve ending sensitive to mechanical pressures or distortions, as those responding to touch and muscle contractions.

mech·a·no·re·cep·tor

(mek'ă-nō-rē-sep'tŏr),
A receptor that responds to mechanical pressure or distortion; for example, receptors in the carotid sinuses, touch receptors in the skin.
Synonym(s): mechanicoreceptor

mechanoreceptor

(mĕk′ə-nō-rĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A specialized sensory end organ that responds to mechanical stimuli such as tension, pressure, or displacement.

mech′a·no·re·cep′tion n.
mech′a·no·re·cep′tive adj.

mechanoreceptor

A sensory receptor that responds to a mechanical stimulus (e.g., pressure or distortion).
 
Examples
Meissner's corpuscles, Merkel's discs, Pacinian corpuscles, Ruffini endings.

mech·a·no·re·cep·tor

(mekă-nō-rĕ-septŏr)
A receptor that responds to mechanical pressure or distortion; e.g., receptors in the carotid sinuses, touch receptors in the skin.

mechanoreceptor

A sensory receptor that responds preferentially to physical deformation such as stretching, twisting, compressing or bending.

mechanoreceptor

a sensory structure that receives mechanical stimuli such as sound, pressure, movement, etc. See, for example, PROPRIOCEPTOR.

mech·a·no·re·cep·tor

(mekă-nō-rĕ-septŏr)
Receptor that responds to mechanical pressure, e.g., receptors in the carotid sinuses.
References in periodicals archive ?
They felt their findings supported the view that an acute inversion sprain does cause trauma and loss of function of mechanoreceptors embedded in the anterior-lateral capsular structures of the ankle.
(1986) Biophysical studies of mechanoreceptors. Journal of Applied Physiology 60, 1107-1115.
It is possible that the portions of the sensorimotor system are not affected by the application of cryotherapy (mechanoreceptors deep to the cryotherapy application region were able to compensate for mechanoreceptors influenced by cryotherapy) [35].
(12) imply that skin mechanoreceptors are more sensitive to mechanical vibration than muscle spindles when vibration at a frequency of 20 to 40 Hz is applied to the soles of the feet, and that vibration within these frequencies affects postural regulation.
Plyometric training is purported to enhance proprioception through repetitive, maximal stimulation of mechanoreceptors as the shoulder is rotated to near end-range motion.
Moreover, crustacean mouthparts are known to have a high density of setae with a great diversity in external morphology (Schembri, 1982; Stemhuis et al., 1998; Garm and Hoeg, 2000; Coelho et al., 2000), and the sparse morphological evidence suggests that most are bimodal mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors (Paffenhofer and Loyd, 2000; Garm et al., 2003).
The neurophysiologic effect is based on the stimulation of peripheral mechanoreceptors and the inhibition of nociceptors.
This avoids the activation of cutaneous receptors like nociceptors and mechanoreceptors (Struppler et al., 2003).
The distention of thoracic circulatory chambers activates mechanoreceptors, which in turn activate a renal reflex adjustment of water and electrolyte excretion (18).
While there is considerable evidence to suggest that single cnidocytes do indeed bear both chemoreceptors (Thurm et al., 1998) and mechanoreceptors (Brinkmann et al., 1995; Thurm et al., 1998) and can discharge in the absence of neurons (Aerne et al., 1991), it is now generally accepted that they are not completely independent effectors.
8A) is intriguing, and the possibility that these cells function as mechanoreceptors should be further examined using electrophysiological approaches.
This indicates that these cells are mechanoreceptors, since it is believed that desmosomal connections between the scolopale and the cilia rootlet are necessary for transduction of the mechanical signal (Schmidt and Gnatzy, 1984; Derby, 1989; Crouau, 2001).