McRoberts maneuver

Mc·Ro·berts ma·neu·ver

(măk-rob'ĕrts),
maneuver to reduce a fetal shoulder dystocia by flexion of the maternal hips.

McRo·berts ma·neu·ver

(mik-rob'ĕrts mă-nū'vĕr)
Maneuver to reduce a fetal shoulder dystocia by flexion of the maternal hips.
References in periodicals archive ?
The defense contended that Morse followed proper procedure, including flexing of the mother's legs known as a "McRoberts maneuver" and the application of suprapubic pressure to ease the birth.
He instituted the McRoberts maneuver followed by suprapubic pressure and the Woods maneuver, all of which were unsuccessful.
It is important to appreciate that the McRoberts maneuver, with or without suprapubic pressure, may be successful in only approximately 50% of shoulder dystocia cases.
Cohn noted that Nurse Payne failed to properly document her knowledge of the presence of shoulder dystocia prior to and after delivery; failed to immediately call for and obtain additional assistance during delivery from qualified medical staff, including but not limited to a neonatologist, anesthesiologist and nursing staff; failed to properly document and obtain additional qualified medical professionals to assist in the performance of the McRoberts Maneuver; and failed to properly assist in the delivery of the baby.
The next set of chapters discusses recognition of dystocia, delivery techniques, the McRoberts maneuver, cephalic replacement, and infant injury.
Instead, address shoulder dystocia by trying the McRoberts maneuver, suprapubic pressure, and early attempts to deliver the posterior arm.
This posture, known as the McRoberts maneuver, widens the angle between the pelvis and the spine, allowing more room for the infant to pass through the birth canal.
performing the McRoberts maneuver combined with suprapubic pressure
Cohn noted that Nurse Payne failed to properly document her knowledge of the presence of shoulder dystocia prior to and after delivery; failed to immediately call for and obtain additional assistance during the delivery, including but not limited to a neonatologist, anesthesiologist, and nursing staff; failed to properly document and obtain additional qualified medical professionals to assist in the performance of the McRoberts Maneuver; and failed to properly assist in the delivery of the baby.
The most successful maneuvers to manage shoulder dystocia during delivery include suprapubic pressure, Wood's "corkscrew" maneuver, and the McRoberts maneuver. Suprapubic pressure and the Wood's maneuver are appropriate in cases of mild shoulder dystocia.
* strategies to reduce NBPP by preventing shoulder dystocia--including early induction of labor and prophylactic use of McRoberts maneuver and suprapubic pressure--have not been effective in reducing the incidence of NBPP.