MacConkey agar

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Mac·Con·key a·gar

(mă-kon'kē),
medium containing peptone, lactose, bile salts, neutral red, and crystal violet, used to identify gram-negative bacilli and characterize them according to their status as lactose fermenters. Fermenters appear as pink colonies whereas nonfermenters are colorless.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

MacConkey agar

A differential and selective growth medium used to isolate and identify gram-negative bacilli, often enteric pathogens, based on fermentation or lack of fermentation of a sugar added to the media. MA is peptone-based and contains bile salts and crystal violet (which inhibit the growth of gram-positive organisms), a sugar (usually lactose) and a pH indicator, allowing differentiation of lactose-fermenting (indicated by pink colonies, e.g., Escherichia coli) and non-lactose-fermenting (colourless colonies, e.g., Proteus mirabilis) bacteria.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Mac·Con·key agar

(mă-kongk'ē ā'gahr)
Medium containing peptone, lactose, bile salts, neutral red, and crystal violet; used to recover gram-negative bacilli and characterize them according to their ability to ferment lactose. Fermenters appear as red colonies, whereas nonfermenters are colorless.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

MacConkey,

Alfred Theodore, English bacteriologist, 1861-1931.
MacConkey agar - a medium used to identify gram-negative bacilli and characterize them according to their status as lactose fermenters. Synonym(s): MacConkey medium
MacConkey medium - Synonym(s): MacConkey agar
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
All the specimens were inoculated on blood agar and McConkey agar (prepared as instructions given by the manufacturer).
The primary isolates were sub cultured on crystal violet blood agar, blood agar, chocolate agar, McConkey agar, and Mannitol salt agar; for purification and identification, isolates were examined for their Gram stain reaction and biochemical characteristics according to Barrow and Feltham (7), Ochei and Kolhatkar (8), and Cheesbrough (9).
LB-MW: Luria Broth in marine water, LB-DW: Luria Broth in distilled water, TSA-MW: Trypticase soy agar in marine water, TSA-DW: Trypticase soy agar in distilled water, McConkey-MW: McConkey agar in marine water, McConkey-DW: McConkey agar in distilled water, CECC-MW: Chromagar E.
All the above samples are cultured on Blood agar, and McConkey agar plates and incubated at 37[degrees]C for 24-48 hrs.
Swabs from ocular discharges were collected aseptically from each bird and cultured on 10% ovine blood agar and McConkey agar by incubating at 37[degrees]C for 48 hrs under aerobic conditions.
The strain did not grow on McConkey agar and was facultatively anaerobic.
Samples were transferred to the McConkey agar (MC agar, Merck, Germany), Chocolate agar (Merck, Germany and Blood agar (Merck, Germany).
UTI was diagnosed urine cultures with Nutrient agar, Blood agar plates and McConkey agar using a calibrated loop (0.01ml).