uterine

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uterine

 [u´ter-in, u´ter-īn]
pertaining to the uterus.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

u·ter·ine

(yū'tĕr-in, ū'ter-īn),
Relating to the uterus.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

uterine

(yo͞o′tər-ĭn, -tə-rīn′)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or in the region of the uterus: the uterine canal; uterine contractions.
2. Having the same mother but different fathers: uterine brothers.
3. Being enclosed and dark; womblike.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

u·ter·ine

(yū'tĕr-in)
Relating to the uterus.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

uterine

1. Pertaining to the UTERUS.
2. Having the same mother but not the same father.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Fataluku kinship terminology prescribes marriage between matrilateral cross cousins (MBD/FZS) who are referred to as ia tupuru and ia nami (the female and male path respectively).
In her classic study of kinship networks, Elizabeth Bott (1957) also describes a "matrilateral stress" in some of the kinship networks of working and middle-class Londoners and suggests that women's efforts to ensure some measure of economic security may motivate them to foster kin ties.
The sociological Chapter 4, for example, dismisses the idea of a millennially static native "traditional society" in favor of a model of cyclical alternation between coexisiting centralized (agnatic) and a diffuse (matrilateral) principles, but without offering detailed supporting evidence.
Over time, these preferences created an overlapping and indeterminate field of kin relations, in which any given kin tie might be 'at once agnatic, matrilateral, and affinal' (Comaroff and Comaroff 1991: 138, emphasis in the original)--meaning that, in practice, kin relationships were susceptible to constant contestation and renegotiation, oriented around relative wealth, power, and so on (ibid:, see also Comaroff 1981).
It should be added, finally, that an individual has a variety of important relations with a network of matrilateral and other close kin (Meggitt 1965a:124, 212).
Leach, "The Structural Implications of Matrilateral Cross-Cousin Marriage", in Rethinking Anthropology, London School of Economics Monographs on Social Anthropology no.
The word 'sang', which literally means 'master' in Wolof, suggests that matrilateral cross-cousins are the 'masters' in their relationship with their patrilateral cross-cousins, who, in turn, are their 'slaves' (jamm (3)).
However, the Ngaranyin practised matrilateral parallel cousin marriage which engenders a different complex of affinal relationships when compared with the Top End where rules do not identify preferred spouses.