mating

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Related to Mating effort: Mate desertion, Remating, double mating

mat·ing

(māt'ing),
The pairing of male and female for the purpose of reproduction.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mating

The pairing of male and female organisms for reproduction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mat·ing

(māt'ing)
The pairing of male and female for the purpose of reproduction.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mating

  1. any reproduction involving two sexes.
  2. (in lower organisms) reproduction between types that differ in physiology but not in physical form.
  3. (in birds and mammals) the behavioural process of pair-formation rather than of copulation leading to sexual reproduction.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Patient discussion about mating

Q. My partner and I have been trying to have a baby? But it have not happen yet, what can we do different. What can I do to find out to make sure that I can have kids?

A. The best way to tell if you can have children or not is by seeing your doctor. Hope this helps.

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References in periodicals archive ?
The summary of these points is that male resource acquisition and sharing strategies among foragers represent a combination of mating effort and parenting effort (Geary, 2010).
Male participation in nest building in the dung beetle Scarabaeus catenatus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae): Mating effort versus paternal effort.
In this study, an interspecific comparative analysis of patterns of covariation between spermatophore size (i.e., spermatophylax and ampulla weights) and measures of male and female reproductive variables is performed in an attempt to distinguish between a paternal investment and a mating effort explanation.
Decreases in testosterone may suppress mating efforts and they may potentially channel a man's energy towards the care of infants.
Females often outnumber males, so males get a good rate of return on their mating efforts, Shapiro says.
Due to mortality costs of reproduction, selection for late-life fitness would likely result in direct selection for reduced early mating efforts in one or both sexes.