parameter

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parameter

 [pah-ram´ĕ-ter]
1. in a mathematical expression, a constant that distinguishes specific cases, having a definite fixed value in one case but different values in other cases.
2. in statistics, a value that specifies one of the members of a family of probability distributions, such as the mean or the standard deviation.
3. a variable whose measure is indicative of a quantity or function that cannot itself be directly determined precisely.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pa·ram·e·ter

(pă-ram'ĕ-tĕr), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word to mean simply 'something measured or measurable'. One of many dimensions or ways of measuring or describing an object or evaluating a subject:
1. In a mathematic expression, an arbitrary constant that can possess different values (with each value defining other expressions), and can thereby determine the specific form but not the general nature of the expression; for example, in the equation y = a + bx, a and b are parameters.
2. In statistics, a term used to define a characteristic of a population, in contrast to a sample from that population, for example, the mean and standard deviation of a total population.
3. In psychoanalysis, any tactic, other than interpretation, used by the analyst to further the patient's progress.
[para- + G. metron, measure]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

parameter

A mathematical and statistical variable in a model system that partially or completely characterises a probability distribution. Parameters are rarely known and are usually estimated by statistical computation from samples. In clinical trials, parameter may be used synonymously with variable for factual data—e.g., age, date of recovery, measurements and clinical assessments; however, it is most often linked to statistical conventions as a numeric characteristic of a population and thus has a narrower definition than variable.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

parameter

Cardiac pacing A term quantifying an operational element determining pacemaker behavior–eg, rate, pulse width, A-V interval, refractory period, etc
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pa·ram·e·ter

(pă-ram'ĕ-tĕr)
1. One of many dimensions or ways of measuring or describing an object or evaluating a subject
2. mathematics An arbitrary constant that can possess different values, each value defining other expressions.
3. statistics A term used to define a characteristic of a population, in contrast to a sample from that population.
4. psychoanalysis Any tactic, other than interpretation, used by the analyst to further the patient's progress.
[para- + G. metron, measure]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pa·ram·e·ter

(pă-ram'ĕ-tĕr)
One of many dimensions or ways of measuring or describing an object or evaluating a subject.
[para- + G. metron, measure]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In sum, when students make mathematical arguments, they do not simply share their answers; instead, they explain and justify the ideas that they had as they thought about and solved the problem.
If students are to learn to make conjectures, experiment with various approaches to solving problems, construct mathematical arguments and respond to others' arguments, then creating an environment that fosters these kinds of activities is essential.
As this quote suggests, fostering an environment in which students explain and justify their ideas is important, but how do we establish environments that promote mathematical arguments? To answer this question, we need to understand the role of teachers and students in classrooms in which explanation and justification are important aspects of mathematics instruction.
I was attempting to help teachers develop the skills in working towards building sound mathematical arguments in collaboration with their colleagues.
To verify that the aforementioned constraints about the structure of the residuals matrices associated with model 1 and model 1 * are true, we offer the following mathematical arguments. The proofs simply involve algebraic manipulation of equations involving the analytical formulae for the maximum likelihood parameter estimates (MLE) of model 1.
396) Standards Pre-K-2 Expectations Instructional programs from In prekindergarten through grade prekindergarten through grade 12 2 all students should-- should enable all students to-- * recognize, name, build, draw, analyze characteristics and compare, and sort two- and properties of two- and three- three-dimensional shapes; dimensional geometric shapes and develop mathematical arguments * describe attributes about geometric relationships and parts of two- and three-dimensional shapes; * investigate and predict the results of putting together and taking apart two- and three-dimensional shapes.
Thorne and Ulvi Yurtsever of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena present mathematical arguments supporting the notion that the presence of a wormhole could locally scramble the relationship between cause and effect.
Having an ability to appreciate, understand, and generate proofs is crucial in being able to evaluate students' mathematical arguments and reasoning.
It is used primarily as a tool to disseminate materials to students in an efficient manner, encourage students to create mathematical arguments and solutions to problems and then learn the skills necessary to write technical solutions or arguments.
We emphasize the teaching of science and mathematics as a process of inquiry in which students learn to solve complex problems and critique scientific and mathematical arguments. We look for uses of computer and communications technology that help students become lifelong science and mathematics learners who are prepared to meet all sorts of challenges from computing their income taxes to interpreting data on global warming to assessing the risk of a medical procedure.
We emphasize the teaching of mathematics as a process of inquiry in which students learn to solve complex problems and critique mathematical arguments. We look for uses of computer and communications technology that help students become lifelong mathematics learners who are prepared to meet all sorts of challenges from computing their income taxes to interpreting data on global warming to assessing the risk of a medical procedure.

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