parental leave

(redirected from Maternity rights)
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parental leave

(păr-ĕn-tăl)
The policy of allowing one or both parents to have leave from work following the birth of their child.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, when a major economic crisis hit the country, both women's use of family planning services and their exercise of their labour and maternity rights and protections were deemed abuses of the system.
Paid holidays, extra maternity rights, equality in the workplace, better conditions for agency and part time workers, none of these were a legal entitlement until the EU passed directives giving them.
It has given us maternity rights and has helped even out the playing field for agency workers.
They are unpredictable and workers have no guarantee of their income from week to week, no protection from unfair dismissal, no maternity rights or redundancy rights, and no sick pay or pensions.
The enhanced rights match Linklaters current maternity rights offering, which provides full pay for up to six months leave, subject to certain conditions.
Not that there is much hope of that when we realise that the British Government was the only one in Europe to oppose the Social Charter giving, among other things equal rights to women and the only one to oppose European plans for giving women better pregnancy and maternity rights.
Ex-Labour Party boss Larry Whitty wondered if there would be a tariff "where you trade maternity rights for so many shares, union rights for a few more, and health and safety for more after that."
There were recommendations that expatriate women and spouses be entitled to the same rights as their Bahraini counterparts in terms of labour rules and medical care, with particular emphasis on maternity rights.
RESEARCH shows there is a widespread problem of pregnant women or those taking up maternity rights finding their job has suddenly disappeared - often disguised as redundancy.
POLICEWOMEN will be soon be given the same maternity rights as civil servants.
There could be tax issues for the employer, not to mention other basic rights such as entitlements to redundancy payments, unfair dismissal protection and maternity rights. "With statutory redundancy entitlements having recently increased this month, and legislation protecting employees becoming ever more protective, the cost of getting this wrong will only get worse year on year."