mating

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mat·ing

(māt'ing),
The pairing of male and female for the purpose of reproduction.

mating

The pairing of male and female organisms for reproduction.

mat·ing

(māt'ing)
The pairing of male and female for the purpose of reproduction.

mating

  1. any reproduction involving two sexes.
  2. (in lower organisms) reproduction between types that differ in physiology but not in physical form.
  3. (in birds and mammals) the behavioural process of pair-formation rather than of copulation leading to sexual reproduction.

Patient discussion about mating

Q. My partner and I have been trying to have a baby? But it have not happen yet, what can we do different. What can I do to find out to make sure that I can have kids?

A. The best way to tell if you can have children or not is by seeing your doctor. Hope this helps.

More discussions about mating
References in periodicals archive ?
truncatum are driven by recognition failure during male mate recognition learning process.
Visual cues in mate recognition by males of the damselfly, Coenagrion puella (L.) (Odonata: Coenagrionidae).
Lande (1982) and West-Eberhard (1983) suggested that the rapid and arbitrary divergence of mate recognition signals under sexual selection could promote behavioral isolation among populations and, ultimately, the formation of new species (see Young et al.
Call Variation in Acoustic Mate Recognition Signals
Sex pheromones are usually involved in asymmetric mate recognition. For example, in two congeneric, partially sympatric copepod species, Temora longicornis males readily detect and follow pheromone trails of Temora stylifera females, and pursue T.
Two types of sex pheromones are involved in mate recognition of some Lysmata species (e.g., L.
Pair-living species may not (and do not need to) depend on distance sex pheromones for mate recognition. Instead, they may depend on contact sex pheromones only for mate recognition.
It is likely that pair-living Lysmata ancestors may depend on contact sex pheromones alone for mate recognition. The presence of aesthetascs in pair-living species are used to detect other olfactory cues (e.g., to detect food odors or to avoid predators).
- Female choice, mate recognition, mating preferences, Physaelaemuspustulosus, sexual selection, species recognition.
For example, some researchers have contended that sexual selection is unlikely to be an important force in signal evolution because species recognition would generate strong stabilizing selection on mate recognition systems, suggesting that if there is species recognition there can not be sexual selection (Templeton, 1979; Gerhardt, 1982; Paterson, 1985).
Alternative explanations for species-specificity have also been proposed, however, including specific mate recognition (Paterson, 1985), and sexual selection (West-Eberhard, 1983; Eberhard, 1985).