Mastophora

Mastophora

An orb-spinning spider, popularly known as bolas spider for the manner in which it catches its prey, projecting a sticky bola-like mass of silk at the target moth or other flying insect.
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Semiarido Marquesa El Molle Familia Especie n % n % Anyphaenidae Gayennoides molles 1 0,7 Ramirez, 2003 Araneidae Mastophora gasteracanthoides (Nicolet, 1849) Mercynogea eryyhromela (Holmberg, 1876) Metepeira galatheae (Thorell, 1891) Dipluridae Chilehexops australis 4 2,7 6 4,1 (Mello-Leitao, 1939) Dysderidac Dysdera crocata Koch, 1838 Filistatidae Filistatidae sp.
Shards of the coralline Mastophora pacifica were collected from Redcliffe, Queensland (27[degrees]14'S; 153[degrees]6'E), and transported to Heron Island for use as a positive control.
The FSW negative control induced 0% metamorphosis by 48 hpi, while the positive control Mastophora pacifica (from Redcliffe, Queensland) induced a mean of 80% metamorphosis by 48 hpi, consistent with previous studies (Jackson et al, 2005).
Sexual mimicry in spiders has been reported only in interspecific interactions such as the bolas spider Mastophora sp.
araneids in the genus Mastophora that feed on moths; Yeargan 1988), are highly dimorphic.
In particular, protandry may be the optimal maturation strategy for males of most spider species, and strong selection for protandry may be the primary cause of extreme sexual size dimorphism in some species, such as those in the genus Mastophora.
Ecology of a bolas spider, Mastophora hutchinsoni: phenology, hunting tactics, and evidence for aggressive chemical mimicry.
A new species of the genus Mastophora is described from Argentina.
But the specimen of Mastophora Holmberg 1876, recently found from Argentina is exceptional in appearance, and I feel it should be described along with the male of M.
Mastophora adults live in trees, attached to a silken substrate, on branches or leaves sometimes on berries or leaf buds mimicking bird droppings.
Family Araneidae Simon 1895 Genus Mastophora Holmberg 1876 Mastophora comica new species Figs.
Mastophora vaquera differs by having a heavier curl at the end of the long median apophysis than other species (Figs.