master

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Mas·ter

(mas'tĕr),
Arthur M., U.S. physician, 1895-1973. See: Master test, Master two-step exercise test.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

master

(mas′tĕr)
In robotic surgery, a device driven by the hand movements of the surgeon or interventionist. The movements of the master are mimicked, reduced, or refined by the surgical instrument (the "slave") in the operative field.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
It's the master stroke of eccentric choreographer Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui, who spent months living with his performers in central China in order to learn about their ancient practices and share his own creative vision.
Raja Pervez Ashraf said that the project of Lady Health Workers (LHWs) was a master stroke of Shaheed Mohtarma Benazir Bhutto's genius, who kept the well-being of rural women close to her heart.
WORLD champion John Higgins hailed the decision to move the Masters to Alexandra Palace as a "master stroke" as he finally warmed to a tournament in which he has often struggled.
Using Villa Park for the big matches was a given, but offering St Andrews, the Hawthorns, Molineux and Bescot as training grounds is a master stroke.
THE late introduction of Vauxhall assistant manager Anthony Wright once again proved a master stroke.
A highly accessible true story of how an ordinary man proved capable of a military master stroke, and the fallout thereafter when the territory he claimed was retaken by Union troops.
Also, having to approach the roundabout in the wrong lane every morning is a master stroke. My reflexes have improved 100% now I have to avoid all the drivers who, funnily enough, insist on going in the left hand lane to go straight on towards Llandarcy and Jersey Marine.
Chris Neath continued his impressive recent form while James Grieves's late call-up to replace the injured Eric Carrillo proved a master stroke by the Monmore management.
Doherty's history of the early political uses of television is never less than fascinating, whether he's talking about Dwight Eisenhower's pioneering but largely overlooked use of the medium ("he orchestrated his television campaign with military precision"), the forgotten impact of Nixon's notorious "Checkers speech" ("by all contemporary reckoning a televisual master stroke"), or "Kefauver Fever" (the popular reaction to televised Senate hearings about organized crime).
"Surgery without anesthesia" was the slogan ex-President Carlos Menem chose for the political master stroke that made him the star pupil of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank in the last decade.
He calls this a master stroke of incompetence: the only way of deciding that the devil is present is by carrying out an exorcism.