Mast cells


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Mast cells

A type of immune system cell that is found in the lining of the nasal passages and eyelids, displays a type of antibody called immunoglobulin type E (IgE) on its cell surface, and participates in the allergic response by releasing histamine from intracellular granules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Treatment focuses on minimizing mast cell degranulation
Mast cells are long-lasting and reside primarily in connective tissue.
Some proteins called transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are able to do this, and we have preliminary evidence from work performed in our lab, that they may be operating in mast cells from human lungs.
The dura maters were stained with toluidine blue (pH: 2.5) to observe mast cells. Mast cells in the dura mater were firstly classified as either intact or degranulated then counted separately with a light microscope by a blinded observer (Olympus CX21) with 10X magnification in the bilateral five objective areas containing the main branches of the middle meningeal artery in each dura mater.
Mast cells distribute in a wide range of mammalian tissues, such as blood vessels, nerves, epithelium and smooth muscle, and may release pro-inflammatory cytokines, including cytokines and growth factors (Galli et al., 1999).
His project is entitled "Defining Mast Cell Phenotype, Activation Pathways and Cellular Interactions that Drive Chronic Symptoms and Endoscopic Changes in Eosinophilic Esophagitis."
Hannah has Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Postural Tachycardia Syndrome (PoTS) and mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) and her life revolves around daily treatments.
Unlike sebaceous cysts or epitheliomas or even melanomas, mast cell tumours cannot reliably be diagnosed by inspection alone.
One group of mice had CRF1 receptors on mast cells and the other group hadn't.
One group of mice was considered "normal" with CRF1 receptors on their mast cells and the other group had cells that lacked CRF1.
The term was introduced to propose a global unifying classification of all mast cell activation disorders, with division into primary (proliferation of abnormal mast cells), secondary (normal mast cells activated in response to a microenvironmental trigger), and idiopathic (no evidence of primary or secondary cause) as shown in Table 1 [1, 5].