surveillance culture

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surveillance culture

The sampling of patients on admission into a hospital admission or an intensive care unitfor the presence of particular microorganisms (such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. or vancomycin-resistant enterococci).
Synonym: active surveillance culture
See also: culture
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References in periodicals archive ?
com/2017/03/mass-spying-isnt-just-intrusive-ineffective/) agrees that while there is a need for surveillance, it might be strategic surveillance and not mass surveillance that is the answer.
Now, instead of being able to conduct mass surveillance on scale, they are forced to compromise select and specific endpoint devices.
Furthermore, according to Ansip and Jourova, the US government has given "written assurance" that it will limit itself and put in safeguards in regards to accessing data and that it will not carry out indiscriminate mass surveillance of European citizens' data.
The US Office of the Director of National Intelligence will provide written commitments that personal data transferred under the new framework will not be subject to indiscriminate mass surveillance, the sources said.
Mass surveillance can't scoop up communications, because they'd just look like gobbledygook in all the reams of data.
Yet our government is attempting to revive the so-called Snooper's Charter, despite it having been debated and abandoned several times already, and despite the US reducing the mass surveillance powers available to the NSA.
Monitoring suspects does not require mass surveillance of the innocent majority.
belief that the NSA's mass surveillance programmes would not withstand a
This manipulative language distortion can be seen perfectly in the recent white-washing report of GCHQ mass surveillance from the servile rubber-stamp calling itself "The Intelligence and Security Committee of the UK Parliament (ISC).
TWEET OF THE DAY @PaulbernalUK Straw and Rifkind are amongst the biggest supporters of mass surveillance.
Human rights groups Liberty, Privacy International and Amnesty, brought a legal challenge against GCHQ after disclosures by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden about mass surveillance programmes known as Prism and Upstream.
The group said this rule, along with the mass surveillance made public by Edward Snowden, has created a chilling effect that is "making it even more difficult for journalists to gather and report news on matters of pub he concern.