concentration

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concentration

 [kon″sen-tra´shun]
1. increase in strength by evaporation.
2. the ratio of the mass or volume of a solute to the mass or volume of the solution or solvent.
3. intense mental focus.
hydrogen ion concentration see hydrogen ion concentration.
mass concentration the mass of a constituent substance divided by the volume of the mixture, as milligrams per liter (mg/l).
mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) the average hemoglobin concentration in erythrocytes, conventionally expressed in “per cent,” meaning grams per deciliter of red blood cells, obtained by dividing the blood hemoglobin concentration (in g/dl) by the hematocrit (in l/l): MCHC = Hb/Hct.
minimal alveolar concentration (MAC) the concentration of anesthetic that at a pressure of 1 atmosphere produces immobility in 50 per cent of subjects exposed to a noxious stimulus.
minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) the lowest concentration of a given antibiotic required to kill a specific organism.
minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) the lowest concentration of a given antibiotic that inhibits the growth of a specific organism.
molar concentration the concentration of a substance expressed in terms of molarity.
concentration test a test of renal function based on the patient's ability to concentrate urine; see also fishberg concentration test.

con·cen·tra·tion (c),

(kon'sen-trā'shŭn),
1. A preparation made by extracting a crude drug, precipitating it from the solution, and drying.
2. Increasing the amount of solute in a given volume of solution by evaporation of the solvent.
3. The quantity of a substance per unit volume or weight. In renal physiology, symbol U for urinary concentration, P for plasma concentration; in respiratory physiology, symbol C for amount per unit volume in blood, F for fractional concentration (mole fraction or volume per volume) in dried gas; subscripts indicate location and chemical species.
[L. con-, together, + centrum, center]
Chemistry The ratio of a mass or volume of a solute to the mass or volume of a solvent
Epidemiology The density of a population in a particular demographic region
Lab medicine The proportion of one molecule or substance to its diluent
Neurology The degree of mental focus required to carry out a task
Respiratory medicine The amount of a particular gas—CO2, O2—in a sampling of air from a patient

concentration

Epidemiology The density of a population in a particular demographic region Lab medicine The proportion of one molecule or substance to its diluent. See Blood alcohol concentration, Critical concentration, Critical dissolved oxygen concentration, Derived air concentration, Minimum bactericidal concentration, Minimum effective concentration, Minimum inhibitory concentration, Passive concentration, Peak serum concentration, Potentially toxic concentration, Serum concentration, Steady-state serum concentration, Total drug concentration, Trough serum concentration Neurology A general term for the degree of mental focus required to carry out a task Toxicology The ratio of a mass or volume of a solute to the mass or volume of a solvent. See Lethal concentration, Median lethal concentration, Minimum detectable concentration.

con·cen·tra·tion

(c) (kon'sĕn-trā'shŭn)
1. A preparation made by extracting a crude drug, precipitating from the solution, and drying.
2. Increasing the amount of solute in a given volume of solution by evaporation of the solvent.
3. The quantity of a substance per unit volume or weight.
4. physiology Symbol U for urinary concentration, P for plasma concentration.
5. respiratory physiology Symbol C for amount per unit volume in blood, F for fractional concentration (mole fraction or volume per volume) in dried gas.
[L. con-, together, + centrum, center]

Concentration

Refers to the amount of solute present in a solution, compared to the total amount of solvent.
Mentioned in: Diabetes Insipidus

con·cen·tra·tion

(kon'sĕn-trā'shŭn)
A preparation made by extracting a crude drug, precipitating it from the solution, and drying it.
[L. con-, together, + centrum, center]

Patient discussion about concentration

Q. Where to concentrate on while losing weight and how? a strongest muscle and largest muscle reduction will help me in losing weight. Where to concentrate on while losing weight and how?

A. why not do a sport that activates more muscles then just one..? running or swimming? those actions work on groups of big muscles and on your heart and lungs system that is very important in order to get in shape.

Q. Does anyone have ideas for ways to overcome concentration problems without depending on medications? I'm reallllllly trying hard to study for my final exams and my ADD seems to bother me every time I touch the desk. Sometimes my thoughts fly out when I only think of how much I still have to study today!!! please- help if you can... I really don't want to start with meds...

A. Omega-3 fatty acids, phosphatidylserine, zinc and magnesium may have benefits with regard to ADD symptoms. i take omega-3 fatty acids every day for the past year and it helped me go threw a ruff year of studying.

More discussions about concentration
References in periodicals archive ?
TEM image (Figures 5(c) and 5(e)) of GM composite prepared with [Mn.sup.2+]/GO mass percent of 50:50 displays the severe agglomeration of [Mn.sub.3][O.sub.4] nanoparticles loaded on the surface of GS.
Figure 6(a) shows the CV curves of GM composites prepared with different mass percent of [Mn.sup.2+]/GO.
It should also be observed that the capacitive current responses increase with decreasing the [Mn.sup.2+]/GO mass percent. The specific capacitances of GM composites prepared with [Mn.sup.2+]/GO mass percent of 10: 90, 20 : 80, 30 : 70, 40 : 60, 50 : 50, and 75: 25 can be calculated using (3), where I is the voltammetric current (A), m is the mass of the active materials in electrode (g), [DELTA]V is the potential window (V), and r is the scan rate (V/s).
The rate performances (Figure 6(b)) of GM composites prepared with different mass percent of [Mn.sup.2+]/GO have been studied by means of GCD technique.
Standard number Mass percent ethylene Old New 1 37 40.1 2 48 52.4 3 55 58.6 4 63 66.8 5 69 70.8 6 79 78.6 7 -- 44.8 8 -- 52.6 9 -- 69.5 10 -- 77.5
The use of these new mass percent ethylene calibrants will result in ethylene values being calculated that differ from those previously expected, giving differences up to 4.5 mass% in certain cases.
The standard, first published in 1980, is broadly accepted within the industry for determining the chemical composition of ethylene-propylene(-diene) rubbers and, in particular, for determining the mass percent ethylene contained, according to Richard Killian, IISRP deputy managing director.
Noordermeer pointed out that the re-established mass percent values for the original six calibrants differ to some extent from the values assigned in 1971 (reference table and graph shown).