mass hysteria

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Related to Mass hallucination: mass hysteria

mass hys·te·ri·a

1. spontaneous, en masse development of identical physical and/or emotional symptoms among a group of people, as seen in a classroom of schoolchildren;
2. a socially contagious frenzy of irrational behavior in a group of people as a reaction to an event.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mass hysteria

n.
A condition in which a large group of people exhibit similar physical or emotional symptoms, such as anxiety or extreme excitement. Also called epidemic hysteria.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mass hysteria

The synchronous appearance in a group of individuals of signs and nonspecific physical symptoms of hysteria, for which no organic cause can be determined. It is transmitted among members of a group by “line of sight” and is more common in young females.

Clinical findings
Nausea, loss of consciousness, vertigo, headache, shortness of breath, fainting, screaming, shaking, crying, muscle weakness, hyperventilation; a general lack of symptoms in those sharing the same physical environment, but in a different timeframe—i.e., of temporal, and not spatial, significance.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mass hysteria

Psychiatry The 'transmission' of anxiety among a group of individuals
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mass hys·te·ri·a

(mas his-ter'ē-ă)
1. Simultaneous identical physical or emotional symptoms among a group of people.
2. A socially contagious frenzy of irrational behavior in a group of people as a reaction to an event.
Synonym(s): mass sociogenic illness.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
But this was no mass hallucination or trick with mirrors - it was the Dunfermline caretaker manager's twin brother Ian.
Ruth Zaporah and friends--Leonard Pitt, Rhiannon, and Bob Ernst the night I was there--went to theatrical extremes, and when it worked, they captured the audience in a zany mass hallucination. Using sounds and facial expressions so outlandish one wondered how anyone could ever again seem sedate, Zaporah and her cohorts played a kind of Beckettian improvisational jazz together.
His briefing document lists possible reasons for UFO sightings, including mass hallucinations, US aircraft, "atmospheric events" and hoaxes, but indicated that none of them provided a fully convincing explanation.