Maslow's hierarchy of needs

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Maslow's hierarchy of needs

 
see need.

Maslow's hierarchy of needs

[mas′lōz]
Etymology: Abraham H. Maslow, American psychiatrist, 1908-1970; Gk, hierarches, position of authority; AS, nied, obligation
(in psychology) a hierarchic categorization of the basic needs of humans. The most basic needs on the scale are the physiological or biological needs, such as the need for air, food, or water. Of second priority are the safety needs, including protection and freedom from fear and anxiety. The subsequent order of needs in the hierarchic progression are the need to belong, to love, and to be loved; the need for self-esteem; and ultimately the need for self-actualization. To progress from one need to another, the more basic need must first be satisfied.
References in periodicals archive ?
This phenomenon can be understood easily by studying the Maslow Hierarchy of Needs.
According to the theory of Maslow Hierarchy of Needs, most of the time an individual's motivation will hover around the lower 4 layer in the hierarchy which is called the layers of deficiency needs [15].
This group of people is those who hovered in the bottom 3 layers of Maslow Hierarchy of Needs (Physiological Needs, Safety Needs and Love/Belonging Needs).
The group of people who is at the top layer of the Deficiency Needs of Maslow Hierarchy of Needs (Esteem Layer) was challenge greatly during organization transformation process
Most people at the top layer of Maslow Hierarchy of Needs will choose to exit the organization.
After looking from the aspect of how individual will react in transformation through the theory of Maslow Hierarchy of Need, it is important to see how organization members as a whole shall be addressed during transformation.
The Maslow hierarchy of needs puts self-actualization at the top of the pyramid, as the need to be pursued when all others are met.