maser

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maser

 [ma´zer]
a device that produces an extremely intense, small and nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation in the microwave region, with all the waves in phase.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Charles Townes with an early maser in 1955, [c] AP
25, 1955, file photo, Charles Hard Townes, Columbia University professor and Nobel laureate, explains his invention the maser during a news conference in New York City.
The original aim of the project was not to build a maser, but to explore how to use double quantum dots -- which are two quantum dots joined together -- as quantum bits, or qubits, the basic units of information in quantum computers.
Unbeknownst to Townes, several other researchers had begun contemplating similar ideas about a maser. At the University of Maryland in College Park, Joe Weber had published a short paper proposing to use stimulated emission as an amplifier of radiation.
Many of the masers existed long enough for their motions to be tracked across the sky and along our line of sight, yielding their 3-D motions through space.
Johnson and the MaSeR management team have identified composite auto parts, blister pack packaging, wire and cable and other composite materials as potential infeed for MaSeRs production lines.
Long term performance is equal to UTC at 5x[10.sup.-14] offset over 3...33 days as measured against an ensemble of active hydrogen masers and NIST + NPL traceable by satellite time transfer techniques.
It is the first time the two observatories have managed to observe the electric waves, called masers, which were emitted by a cloud of silicon monoxide gas surrounding a VY star in the Great Dog constellation.
A post-processed time scale, involving an ensemble of five hydrogen masers, has been developed by a NIST scientist in Boulder to serve as a reference for comparing primary frequency standards.
VSOP will be looking at two main groups of radio sources: active galaxies and masers.
Megamasers, as the name suggests, have a much higher luminosity, and can be over 100 million times brighter than the masers found in galaxies like the Milky Way.