marsupial

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mar·su·pi·al

(mar-sū'pē-ăl),
1. A member of the order Marsupalia, which includes such mammals as kangaroos, wombats, bandicoots, and opossums, the female of which has an abdominal pouch for carrying the young.
2. Of or pertaining to marsupials.
[L. marsupium, a pouch]

marsupial

(mär-so͞o′pē-əl)
n.
Any of various nonplacental mammals of the infraclass Metatheria, including kangaroos, opossums, bandicoots, and wombats, found principally in Australia and the Americas, and typically bearing young that suckle and develop after birth in the mother's pouch. These species were formerly placed in the order Marsupialia.
adj.
1. Of or belonging to the infraclass Metatheria.
2. Relating to or having a marsupium.

marsupial

adjective Referring to a pouch.

noun Any pouched mammal of the order Marsupialia.

marsupial

any member of the subclass Marsupialia (also called Didelphia or Metatheria) containing mammals characterized by the absence of a placenta and the presence of a pouch to which the young, born in an undeveloped state, migrate during early development. The pouch contains the mammary glands, which vary in number between species, and the young complete their development here. The group was at one time widespread, but now is restricted to Australasia and South America. In Australasia, marsupials, free from competition from EUTHERIAN (placental) mammals, have radiated to occupy most niches elsewhere occupied by placental forms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The unique lifecycles and mating practices of many carnivorous marsupials are described for species across wide-ranging habitats, including forests, rocky outcrops and deserts.
The objective of this review is to provide a synthesis of the data currently existing in the literature on visual acuity in marsupials with the aim of comparing and relating ganglion cell topography with the adaptation of the species to their lifestyle and, in turn with their taxonomic classification.
The behaviour described in the presented study differs from other situations in which marsupials hunt bats; in those other cases, the marsupials stalked bats in silence (see Breviglieri & Pedro 2010, Breviglieri & Uieda 2014).
Hunter explained that the contained spreader space of the MINI tripod was particularly effective for the production of Wonders of Marsupials, especially for filming species such as bettongs, which are small, ground-dwelling marsupials.
43-50, in: Mammals of South America, Volume 1: Marsupials, Xenarthrans, Shrews and Bats (AL Gardner, ed.).
His parents took it in turn to hold him in their arms and then to support him as he stood up and held on to a low clear plastic fence surrounding the marsupial's pen.
KANGAROOS are a member of the marsupial class of mammals.
In addition to continuing to investigate the similarities and differences between rodents and marsupials, the team is also using these insights from biological whisker sensing to develop animal-like robots that can use artificial whiskers to navigate without vision.
The neurobiology of Australian marsupials; brain evolution in the other mammalian radiation.
The patient resided in a national forest on the east coast of New South Wales, Australia, an area where marsupials are abundant.
But marsupials such as kangaroos and possums, whose young develop in a pouch instead of a womb, have relative brain sizes as big as those of other mammals despite slower metabolic rates.