horehound

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hore·hound

, hoarhound (hōr-hownd),
Marrubium vulgare (family Labitae); bitter principle is marrubium, a volatile oil. A compound alleged to have expectorant properties and often found in cough drops and other patent medicines.
[O.E. hār, hoary, + hūne, herb]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

horehound

(hôr′hound′)
n.
1.
a. An aromatic plant (Marrubium vulgare) in the mint family having leaves with white pubescence and numerous white flowers in axillary cymes, native to Eurasia. The leaves yield a bitter extract used in flavoring and as a cough remedy.
b. A candy or preparation flavored with this extract.
2. Any of several similar plants in the mint family, especially Ballota nigra.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Marrubium vulgare, also known as White Horehound, is a medicinal plant that belongs to the Lamiaceae family.
Mercury accumulation and resistance to mercury stress in Rumex induratus and Marrubium vulgare grown in perlite.
In this paper we investigate the association between Retama and the understory herb Marrubium vulgare in a semiarid region.
Horehound (Marrubium vulgare), Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) and Slippery Elm (Ulmus rubra).
Many of these introduced plants have become weeds, including St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), plantain (Plantago lanceolata), white horehound (Marrubium vulgare), mullein (Verbascum thapsus), chickweed (Stellaria media), nettle (Urtica dioica), shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris), dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis) and yellow dock (Rumex crispus) (Lamp 1983).
According to SPINS/IRI, the top-selling herbal supplements, as coded by primary ingredient, in the mainstream multi-outlet channel in 2014 were horehound (Marrubium vulgare), a key ingredient in throat lozenges; cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon), popular primarily for its claimed benefit of helping maintain urinary tract health; echinacea (Echinacea spp.), which enjoys widespread use during cold and flu season; black cohosh (Actaea racemosa), a popular aid to manage menopausal symptoms; and flax or flaxseed oil (Linum usitatissimum), a source of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids used in the management of a variety of conditions, including high cholesterol and heart disease.
Amplified Marrubiurn plant cells (developed from marrubium vulgare) have been shown to contain such beneficial molecules, and cosmetic studies with the cells show that they deliver both high free radical scavenging activity and pre-activate several Phase II defense enzymes.
Clinical trial of Cecropia obstusifolia and Marrubium vulgare leaf extracts on blood glucose and serum lipids in type 2 diabetics.
r en 7; Allium roseum, Brachypodium sylvaticum y Equisetum arvense (+) en 8; Equisetum telmateia 1 y Bromus squarrosus + en 10; Carthamus lanatus, Cynosurus echinatus 1 y Bromus diandrus + en 12; Bromus lanceolatus, Daphne gnidium, Mantisalca salmantica, Ononis spinosa, Saponaria officinalis y Thapsia villosa + en 11; Dittrichia viscosa 2, Marrubium vulgare 1 y Retama sphaerocarpa + en 14; Mentha pulegium 3, Bellardia trixago y Trifolium campestre 1, Briza minor, Trifolium angustifolium y Trifolium spumosum + en 16; Carduus bourgeanus 1 y Taeniatherum caput-medusae + en 17.
Horehound (Marrubium vulgare) was one plant we first welcomed but then cursed, when it grew to form a solid wall of waist-high vegetation.