marmot

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mar·mot

(mar'mot),
A woodchuck or groundhog; a hibernating rodent that may serve as reservoir host of plague bacillus in North America.
[Fr. marmotte]
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Without this artificial stimulation, awake, hibernating marmots do not eat - even when researchers place food in front of them.
This temperature change isn't enough to be statistically significant, but it seems to have relevance for the marmots, says botanist Ken Thompson of the University of Sheffield in England.
When marmots whistle an alarm, their bodies shake, a mercy for scientists trying to figure out who's making the noise.
The event was held in order to determine and include into the database the number of marmots for the protection and rational use.
We would not have expected the genetic diversity of alpine marmots to be so low," says Gossmann.
While GB is home to many rare species such as Marco Polo sheep, ibex, markhor, urial, blue sheep, lynx, snow leopard, leopard cat, brown and black bears, wolf, fox, marmot, chakor and ram chakor and golden eagle, otter, and the recently discovered Pallas's cat, Mr Nizari said the population of some protected species was shrinking speedily.
It must be noted that marmots are not nearly as inherently social as humans generally are.
Yellow-bellied marmots like me make our homes in the mountains of the western United States and Canada.
Analysis of 250 prey remains ([bar.x] = 7.3 individuals/sample, s = 5.4) showed that mammals constituted the highest proportion of diets by frequency (56.4%) and biomass (79.0%), and were predominantly Yellow-bellied Marmots, Coyotes, and deer (Table 1).
Marmots are large, squirrel-type rodents that live in mountainous areas.
In spring 2011 (late April-mid-May), we captured Alpine marmots in two-door, live-capture traps, following a procedure by Cohas et al.