equilibrium

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equilibrium

 [e″kwĭ-lib´re-um]
1. harmonious adjustment of different elements or parts; called also balance.
2. a state of chemical balance in the body, reached when the tissues contain the proper proportions of various salts and water. See also acid-base balance and fluid balance.
dynamic equilibrium the condition of balance between varying, shifting, and opposing forces that is characteristic of living processes.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm),
1. The condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
See also: equilibrium constant.
2. In chemistry, a state of apparent repose created by two reactions proceeding in opposite directions at equal speed; in chemical equations, sometimes indicated by two opposing arrows (⇄) instead of the equal sign.
See also: equilibrium constant. Synonym(s): dynamic equilibrium
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

equilibrium

Imaging
An MRI term for a state of balance between two opposing forces or divergent spheres of influence.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

equilibrium

A state of constancy in a system; a population might be in static equilibrium–no pasa nada–ie, no births or deaths, or in dynamic equilibrium–ie, same numbers of births and deaths; the state to which a system evolves–eg, sustained periodic oscillations. See Chemical equilibrium, Linkage equilibrium, Sedimentation equilibrium Neurology A state of balance in the body, where forces are appropriately offset by counterforces. Cf Dizziness, Equilibrium, Vertigo Orthopedics A state of biomechanical homeostasis that enables persons to know where their bodies are in the environment and to maintain a desired position. See Fixed point equilibrium.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm)
1. The condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
2. chemistry A state of apparent repose created by two reactions proceeding in opposite directions at equal speed; in chemical equations, sometimes indicated by two opposing arrows (↔) or (⇌).
Synonym(s): dynamic equilibrium.
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

e·qui·lib·ri·um

(ē'kwi-lib'rē-ŭm)
Condition of being evenly balanced; a state of repose between two or more antagonistic forces that exactly counteract each other.
[L. aequilibrium, a horizontal position, fr. aequus, equal, + libra, a balance]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The market equilibrium of the Southern and Northern goods, Equations (6) and (7), could be as follows because income transfer from the Southern profit income to a Northern one is done.
This cost creates an advantage for a market equilibrium characterized by long-term relationships between primary insurers and reinsurers, a reinsurance premium structure that adjusts with the arrival of new information on disaster risk, enforceable compensation schemes to correct for ex ante mispricing, and the sanctioning of primary insurance companies who drop reinsurance coverage in the aftermath of a disaster.
In a market equilibrium, however, the primary insurer cannot defect as long as all reinsurance companies in the market punish a defecting primary insurance company by refusing to write reinsurance under the terms of an implicit long-term contract.
The preceding discussion manifests the advantages of creating an "efficient" mechanism for diversifying upper layers of disaster risk intertemporally - where, in this context, an "efficient" mechanism is one that does not distort the existing private market equilibrium by mispricing the risk absorbed through the contract.(5) Given its trivial bankruptcy risk, the federal government is a likely candidate for offering such a mechanism.