Anderson

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An·der·son

(an'dĕr-sŏn),
Evelyn, 20th-century U.S. physician, 1899-1985. See: Anderson-Collip test.

An·der·son

(an'dĕr-sŏn),
Roger, U.S. surgeon, 1891-1971. See: Anderson splint, Roger Anderson pin fixation appliance.

An·der·son

(an'dĕr-sŏn),
James C., 20th-century British urologist.

An·der·son

(an-dĕr'son),
William, British dermatologist and surgeon, 1842-1900.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps the most visible singer-focused battle for social justice was Marian Anderson's effort to perform at Washington's Constitution Hall in 1939, which was at the time under the management of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR).
I thought of Marian Anderson as I read Bishop Edward Braxton's very personal reflection on racism (Page 17) and Catholic scholars' discussions of racism and police violence (Pages 1 and 30).
A seventeen-page chronology pinpoints the importance of Marian Anderson, W.
Early in her career, she was sometimes compared to the two great contraltos of mid-century, Kathleen Ferrier and Marian Anderson. But Forrester needed comparison with no one.
For example, teachers will want to explore Brian Pinkney's signature scratchboard renderings done in oil pastels and the unique style of Brian Selznick who portrayed the entire life story of opera singer Marian Anderson in beautiful shades of brown.
Marian Anderson, 56 from Denmark, was hit as she crossed a road in Camden, north London, on February 21.
Sweet Land of Liberty is the story of a groundbreaking 1939 Easter Sunday concert, when Marian Anderson performed before the Lincoln Memorial to over 75,000 people--and the story of the man responsible for the concert, Oscar Chapman, Assistant Secretary of the Interior under President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.
You'll also find more recent keystone State luminaries, like the singer Marian Anderson and Rachel Carson, who wrote Silent Spring.
When modern Israel was born in 1948, Marian Anderson was a well-wisher, but at a distance.
In chronological order and by secular and sacred designations, writings are preceded by brief biographies of singers such as Eva Jessye, Josephine Wright, Sissieretta Jones, the original Fisk University Jubilee Singers, Roland Hayes, Paul Robeson, Marian Anderson, Dorothy Maynor, Leontyne Price, Jessye Norman, and Denyce Graves, among others.
Others included in the book are Marian Anderson, Maya Angelou, Ludwig van Beethoven, Pablo Casals, Charles Chaplin, Charles Dickens, Robert Frost, Martha Graham, Wolfgang Mozart, Edgar Allan Poe, William Shakespeare and Frank Lloyd Wright.