marginal mandibular branch of facial nerve

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mar·gi·nal man·dib·u·lar branch of fa·cial nerve

[TA]
branch of parotid plexus of facial nerve that parallels the mandibular margin innervating the risorius muscle and muscles of lower lip and chin.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The injury of the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve developing in our case is thought to be the primary cut created by the water jet.
Next, by using the extraoral submandibular approach on both sides, after the skin incision was made 1.5 cm below the mandibular border, the platysma muscle and the superficial layer of the deep cervical fascia were sectioned, and with taking care of the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve, facial vein, and facial artery, the pterygomasseteric connection was reached.
A cadaveric study was conducted to examine the correlation of an anatomy of the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve and its surrounding tissues [9].
Han, "The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve in Koreans," Clinical Anatomy: The Official Journal of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists and the British Association of Clinical Anatomists, vol.
The marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve exits the parotid gland along its anteroinferior aspect (Liebman et al, 1988; Owsley & Agarwal; Davies et al, 2016).
Paralysis of the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve: treatment options.
A possible complication of surgery in the submandibular triangle is damage to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve. It is much less common to damage the lingual and hypoglossal nerves.
(2.) Arvinder Pal singh Batra, Anupama Mahajan and Kerunesh Gupta, Marginal Mandibular branch of the facial nerve; An anatomical study; Indian J Plast Surg., /2010 Jan--Jun;vol 43(1); page no:60-64.
The cervical lamina encloses the ster-nocleidomastoid muscle, the external jugular vein, the submandibular gland the facial vessels, and the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve (Figure 1(a)).
The transcervical approach also places the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve at risk of transection, which may result in postoperative lip weakness, but this risk can be minimized by careful dissection in the appropriate plane.
Weakness of the left marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was present.
We performed this procedure on 19 patients and observed only 1 postoperative complication mild paresis of the right marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve following the excision of a Warthin's tumor.