marginal cost

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Related to Marginal costs: Marginal revenue, Opportunity costs

marginal cost

An actuarial term referring to the additional cost required to produce an additional unit of benefit (e.g., unit of health outcome).
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I will also give him a pass for leaving the impression that nearly zero marginal cost makes a good nearly free.
Andersson & Ogren (2007) state that in order to achieve a competitive transport sector, infrastructure charges in the European Union should be based on short-run marginal costs.
As mentioned above, our approach is based on the fact that e-RA bids reveal some information about the suppliers' marginal costs (Zhang and Jin 2007), which may enhance the knowledge base of marginal costs beyond that introduced in previous research.
powertrain] as a function of marginal costs as shown in Equation (8):
Many oil analysts include tax and revenue requirements in their estimate of marginal costs on the grounds that OPEC producers and other states need certain minimum prices and revenues to balance their budgets and avoid social unrest.
While lagged measures of marginal costs (unit labor costs and output) and lagged expectations remain insignificant, lagged inflation enters significantly.
Costs are understated, and prices fail to reflect marginal costs, leading to excess consumption, overextended and undermaintained infrastructure, and stifled innovation.
The review of empirical studies distinguishes between papers in which marginal costs are included in the observations and, hence, are directly used in the estimation and studies that treat marginal costs as a latent variable.
But the fact that Dupuit's prescription could result in the government having to recover for operational losses does not mean that Ekelund and Hebert are incorrect in arguing that Dupuit was not advocating marginal cost pricing where average cost is decreasing.
Overall, the marginal cost of the carbon storage activity ranges from $19 per metric ton ($17 per ton) from eliminating cotton production to $1,538 per metric ton ($1,395 per ton) for discontinuing soybean production on sandy soils.
Suppose, however, that this innovation reduces the marginal costs of abatement by others by much more than it reduces the defendant's own costs.
Thus, the GM relates to the usual economics definition of incremental or marginal cost.