agar

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Related to Mannitol Salt Agar: blood agar, EMB agar, MacConkey agar

agar

 [ag´ahr]
a dried hydrophilic, colloidal substance extracted from various species of red algae. It is used in cultures for bacteria and other microorganisms, in making emulsions, and as a supporting medium in procedures such as immunodiffusion and electrophoresis. Because of its bulk it is also used in medicines to promote peristalsis and relieve constipation.

a·gar

(ah'gar, ā'gar),
A complex polysaccharide (a sulfated galactan) derived from seaweed (various red algae); used as a solidifying agent in culture media; it has the valuable properties of melting at 100°C, but not of solidifying until 49°C. Synthetic agars are also available.
[Bengalese]

agar

(ā′gär′, ä′gär′) also

agar-agar

(ā′gär-ā′gär′, ä′gär-ä′-)
n.
1. A gelatinous material derived from certain marine algae. It is used as a base for bacterial culture media and as a stabilizer and thickener in many food products.
2. A culture medium containing this material.

Agar

(1) Agar
A gelatinous, sulfated polysaccharide extracted primarily from Gelidium cartilagineum, Gracilaria confervoides, and related species of red algae (seaweed); it melts at ±100ºC and solidifies at ±40ºC.
Herbal medicine Agar has been used as a bulk laxative, as it is highly hydrophilic. 
Microbiology Agar is the most commonly used support medium for bacterial and fungal culture, as nutrients, antibiotics, salts and various growth enhancers and inhibitors are easily incorporated into the media.
Agar is also used as an emulsifier in foods; it cannot be digested by humans.
(2) AGAR
Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance Study. An ongoing surveillance of antimicrobial resistance in Australian teaching hospitals,which began in 1986.

a·gar

(ā'gahr)
A complex polysaccharide (a sulfated galactan) derived from seaweed (various red algae); used as a solidifying agent in culture media. It has the valuable property of melting at 100°C but not solidifying above 49°C.
[Bengalese]

agar

A seaweed extract, sometimes called agar-agar, much used in bacteriological laboratories because it forms a convenient gel for the suspension of nutrient culture material, such as blood or broth, on which micro-organisms can be grown in an incubator.

agar

a complex POLYSACCHARIDE obtained from marine algae, which is widely used (in gel form) as a solidifying agent. Agar has two main components, agarose and agaropectin. Agar is used in various kinds of microbiological MEDIUM, and refined forms of agar or agarose are used in techniques such as ELECTROPHORESIS and gel filtration. In industry it is used as a gelling agent in foods such as jellies, soups and ice cream.

Agar has certain properties that make it particularly valuable in MICROBIOLOGY:

  1. it is translucent or transparent and is degraded by only a few MICROORGANISMS.
  2. it melts at about the boiling point of water, but remains liquid until the temperature has dropped to about 40–45 °C, when gelling occurs. Thus it can be poured over or mixed with a bacterial INOCULUM at about 50 °C, without injuring the bacteria. Once it has solidified it can be incubated at temperatures up to about 65 °C, perhaps higher, without liquifying. This is particularly useful where THERMOPHILIC microorganisms are being grown.

Agar medium is prepared by adding agar, often before autoclaving (see AUTOCLAVE), to the nutrients etc. of the medium. Agar medium is generally contained in a PETRI DISH (plate) or test tube. The test tubes containing agar are called ‘slants’ or ‘slopes’ when they allow the medium to set at an angle. When the agar solidifies in a vertical tube it is called a ‘deep’. In a Petri dish the medium solidifies as a layer over the base of the dish.

Agar

A gel made from red algae that is used to culture certain disease agents in the laboratory.
Mentioned in: Throat Culture

a·gar

(ā'gahr)
A complex polysaccharide (a sulfated galactan) derived from seaweed (various red algae); used as a solidifying agent in culture media.
[Bengalese]
References in periodicals archive ?
aureus: Petri plates of Mannitol Salt agar expressed growth for both steam autoclave utility gloves and used utility gloves.
Table 1: Bacteriological analysis results of Um-Jingir samples Microorganisms Minimum Maximum (cfu) (cfu) APCs 3x[10.sup.4]/ml 3.5x[10.sup.7]/ml Coliform count 3/100ml 1400/100ml MacConkey's agar count 2x[10.sup.2]/ml 2.7x[10.sup.4]/ml Mannitol salt agar count 2x[10.sup.2]/ml 1.6x[10.sup.4]/ml Table 2: Incidence of Enterobacteriaceae and pseudomonad organisms recovered from analyzed samples of Um-Jingir as presumptively identified Organism Number of samples Percentage Proteus spp.
aureus colonies identified on mannitol salt agar were confirmed as MRSA by use of CHROMagar MRSA.
After filtration of all the liquid, five washes were performed with 100 mL of sterile distilled water, the membranes were placed on the surface of Petri dishes containing Mannitol Salt Agar and incubated at 36.5 [+ or -] 1[degrees]C.
Following the morphological studies of bacterial colonies and cells, the biochemical properties of unknown bacteria were explored through their growth and colony color on two selective and differential media, MacConkey agar and mannitol salt agar, and the results of the oxidase test.
and had capability to ferment mannitol salt agar to produce large yellow zone colonies like a golden stain (Fig.
Speciation of CoNS was done based on Kloos and Schleifer classification and Koneman [1,2] by studying the colony morphology on nutrient agar, Gram reaction of smear, Haemolysis on blood agar, Mannitol salt agar, Catalase test, Coagulase test, Modified oxidase test, nitrate reduction test, Voges-Proskauer test, Urease test, Oxidative fermentative test, DNAse test, Phosphatase test, Ornithine decarboxylase, Sugar fermentation-Glucose, lactose, Mannitol, Mannose, Trehalose, Xylose, Novobiocin and Polymyxin B 300 Susceptibility test.
Swabs were inoculated on blood and mannitol salt agar and incubated at 37oC for 24 hours.
Morphological examination by Gram staining technique was done and simultaneously culturing was also performed on blood agar, chocolate agar, brain heart infusion agar, china blue lactose agar, china blue maintol agar, mannitol salt agar, sulfide indole motility medium, nutrient gelatin and triple sugar iron agar.
Different bacterial and fungal pathogens were isolated and identified through staining technique, biochemical tests and using different growth media like selective (Mannitol salt agar), differential (MacConkey's agar), enrichment (Blood agar and Chocolate agar) etc.
Culture media used throughout this study are Blood agar base, Mannitol salt agar, Mueller Hinton (MH) agar and broth, Nutrient agar from Hi media, India, Brain heart infusion (BHI) agar from Oxoid, England, and Cetrimide agar from Hardy Diagnostics, USA.