mannerism

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Related to Mannerist style: mannerism

man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm),
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

man·ner·ism

(man'ĕr-izm)
A peculiar or unusual characteristic mode of movement, action, or speech.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mannerism

A peculiar modification or exaggeration of style or habit of dress, speech, or action.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Patient discussion about mannerism

Q. In what manner does bipolar reflect?

A. this is very difficult when you are not used to know the symptoms. such persons turn very fast and heavily from euphoric to depressive. the behaviour is then always excessive and sometimes not anymore under control. the risk to go in an asylum is acute.

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References in periodicals archive ?
He identifies Rosso, Pontormo, and Bronzino as exponents of an experimental trend, characterizing Mannerist style as "an anachronistic construct" (39).
"Mannerist style would therefore persist as a known and available alternative even after it had been superseded in general favor by another style" (327).
* Look at the work of other artists' paintings of the time, especially those working in the Mannerist style. The best pictures to look at are by the artists who most influenced El Greco, especially the later work of the Venetian painter, Titian, and the strongly Mannerist pictures of Tintoretto.
He was a prominent novelist and short story author of the 1960s and '70s; his best novels, Camp Concentration and 334, displayed a cool, distanced mannerist style tending toward a razor wit (often seen in this book as well), revealing social nuances of possible futures.
Underlying the analysis of plays such as Troilus and Timon is a theory of Mannerist style that Williams never pauses to articulate, though it is presumably the basis for some wild-seeming assertions about the Mannerist role in 'negotiat[ing] change from universalism to pluralism' (p.