manikin

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man·i·kin

, mannikinmannequin (man'i-kin),
A model, especially one with removable pieces, of the human body or any of its parts.
See also: phantom (2).
[dim. of man]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

manikin

(man′i-kĭn) [Dutch manneken, little man]
A model of the human body or its parts, used esp. in teaching anatomy and emergency medical and nursing procedures.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The 30kg manikins provide a realistic tool for lifeguards to simulate the rescue of a real person who is potentially drowning.
Comparison of the GlideRite to the conventional malleable stylet for endotracheal intubation by the Macintosh laryngoscope: a simulation study using manikins. Clin Exp Emerg Med.
After learning that nursing academics in our own multi-campus university were uncomfortable with the use of manikins for simulation, our research team secured a grant to design and evaluate a SLE aimed at addressing their concerns by providing pedagogical and technological support.
The manikins respond physiologically to what ever is done to them.
"Not knowing quite what to expect, I was most impressed with the patient manikins and can see why they are extremely valuable tools for teaching and learning.
Different from our results, another study performed on manikins reported longer intubation times in the McGrath video laryngoscope group (median time: 40.7 sec, IQR: 31.0-57.4) compared to the Macintosh laryngoscope group.12 In another manikin study Ruetzler et al.
The donation of these resuscitation manikins has occurred just in time for them to be put to excellent good use at a local event, where the Stanford & Corringham First Responder Group are planning to demonstrate CPR to around 900 school children.
This study evaluated the ISO 5353 Seat Index Point Tool (SIPT) as an alternative to the SAE J826 H-point manikin for measuring military seats.
This station allowed students to practice on manikins and receive immediate feedback.
After studying some competence processes in Canada and the United States, the council opted to use live actors, rather than high-tech manikins, for two reasons, according to chief executive Carolyn Reed.
McAdams said it will contain more than $2 million in the latest medical simulators and equipment that will give students practice in nursing techniques on lifelike manikins.