mandible

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mandible

 [man´dĭ-b'l]
the horseshoe-shaped bone forming the lower jaw. adj., adj mandib´ular. It consists of a central portion, which forms the chin and supports the lower teeth, and two perpendicular portions, or rami, which point upward from the back of the chin on either side and articulate with the temporal bones.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

man·di·ble

(man'di-bŭl), [TA]
A U-shaped bone (in superior view), forming the lower jaw, articulating by its upturned extremities with the temporal bone on either side.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mandible

(măn′də-bəl)
n.
1. The lower jaw of a vertebrate animal.
2. Either the upper or lower part of the beak in birds.
3. Any of various mouth organs of invertebrates used for seizing and biting food, especially either of a pair of such organs in insects and other arthropods.

man·dib′u·lar (-dĭb′yə-lər) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mandible

The lower jaw bone. The joint where the mandible meets the upper jaw at the temporal bone is called the temporomandibular joint.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

man·di·ble

(man'di-bĕl) [TA]
A U-shaped bone, forming the lower jaw, articulating by its upturned extremities with the temporal bone on either side.
Synonym(s): jaw bone, mandibula, submaxilla.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Enlarge picture
LEFT LATERAL VIEW OF MANDIBLE

mandible

(man′dĭ-bĕl) [L. mandibula, lower jawbone]
The horseshoe-shaped bone forming the lower jaw.
See: illustrationmandibular (-dib′yŭ-lăr), adjective
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

mandible

The lower jaw bone. The head of the mandible, on either side, articulates with a hollow on the underside of the temporal bone, just in front of the ear. This is called the temporo-mandibular joint. The mandible is pulled upwards by powerful masticatory muscles. In dislocation of the mandible, the heads slip forward out of the hollows in the temporal bone and the mouth remains wide open until the dislocation is reduced by downward pressure on the back teeth.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

mandible

that part of the mouthparts of an animal which does most of the crushing of food materials. In vertebrates, the term usually denotes the lower jaw. In insects and other arthropods, the mandibles are one of a pair of mouthparts used for crushing food (see Fig. 197 ).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Mandible

The medical term for the lower jaw. One type of oral appliance used to treat OSA pushes the mandible forward in order to ease breathing during sleep.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

man·di·ble

(man'di-bĕl) [TA]
U-shaped bone (in superior view), forming lower jaw, articulating by its upturned extremities with temporal bone on either side.
Synonym(s): jaw bone, lower jaw, mandibulum, submaxilla.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Complete fossil phyllocarid mandible from Middle Devonian rocks of the Hamilton Group, Hungry Hollow, Ontario.
edax based on several characters: interfrontal fontanelles; deep zygomatic plate with anterior border slightly concave and anterodorsal corner projecting as a short spine; mandible robust with coronoid process higher than the articular condyle; anterior margin of masseteric crest extending to the level of protoconid m1; molars large, prismatic and flat crowned, with penetrating flexi and flexids (Figs.
Unfortunately, long-term studies indicate that the only lasting effect is in the midface, not in the mandible. This surprising result has led some influential clinicians to argue for earlier treatments, and others, for later.
The dental formula of our specimens was coincident with that of the mandible observed (CAS 39607).
Thus, the larva of Thermonectus basilaris has a more or less closed cibarial system between the distal opening of the mandibles and the mouth that is similar to systems described for other species of Dytiscinae (4, 5, 6, 7, 10).
Age is easily recognised from mandibles taken from calves and yearlings, while mandibles from animals [greater than or equal to] 2 years old are limited to a tooth wear assessment, using Classes II through IX of the 10-class system developed by Passmore et al.
Right minus left differences for each of the three estimates of the 10 mandible characters in all [F.sub.2] mice first were plotted and several outliers (amounting to about 1/7 of 1% of the total values) eliminated according to criteria given in Sokal and Rohlf (1995).
On the lateral view of the mandibles, the first and second PC cumulative variance explained 82%, E.miletus, E.
The skeletal malocclusion Class I also known as neutrocllusion occurs when the maxilla and mandible are in harmony with each other, Class II which is also known as distoocclusion occurs when the mandible is distally positioned in relation to maxilla and is further divided into two sub divisions and Class III which is also known as mesioocclusion occurs when mandible is mesially positioned in relation to maxilla.
Two thousand nine hundred and one (2901) dry mandibles were randomly selected from the Kirsten collection at the Stellenbosch University, the Raymond A.
The following metric values of dried cadaveric human mandibles were compared between male and female and student's t-test performed, and the 'p' value was found out.
Orthopedic wire fixation is one of the most commonly advocated method for management of mandible fracture.