mammal

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mammal

 [mam´al]
an individual of the Mammalia, a division of vertebrates, including all that possess hair and suckle their young. adj., adj mammal´ian.

mam·mal

(mam'ăl),
An animal of the class Mammalia.

mammal

(măm′əl)
n.
Any of various warm-blooded vertebrate animals of the class Mammalia, including humans, characterized by a covering of hair on the skin and, in the female, milk-producing mammary glands for nourishing the young.

mam·ma′li·an (mă-mā′lē-ən) adj. & n.

mammal

any animal of the class Mammalia, a group of about 4250 species, often regarded as the most highly evolved animals, and so named because they all possess MAMMARY GLANDS. There are three living subclasses:
  1. Monotremata - MONOTREMES, primitive egg-laying mammals such as the duck-billed platypus and Echidna, the spiny ant eater.
  2. Marsupialia - MARSUPIALS, which transfer their young to pouches for the latter part of their early development.
  3. Eutheria - EUTHERIANS, which have a placenta.

Mammals are characterized by the presence of hair, a DIAPHRAGM used in AERIAL RESPIRATION, milk secretion in the female (LACTATION) for suckling the young, presence of only the left systemic arch in the blood circulatory system, three auditory ossicles in the ear, and a lower jaw of a single pair of bones. In all classes except the monotremes, the young are born live (see VIVIPAROUS).

References in periodicals archive ?
Mammalian heart renewal by pre-existing cardiomyocytes.
Daggett, "Lymphatic vessels of the mammalian heart," Anatomical Record, vol.
It was also assumed that the mammalian heart did not have any stem cells that could be used to form new heart muscle cells.
The third, directional asymmetry, results when development occurs on one side of the body but not the other, as in the case of the mammalian heart. The aberrations involved in fluctuating asymmetry are more random than these other two and can arise both during development and over the course of an animal's lifetime.
BAD NAUHEIM, Germany, November 28,2013 -- Until a few years ago, the common school of thought held that the mammalian heart had very little regenerative capacity.
However, prior to heart failure, damaged mammalian heart muscle cells enter a save-yourself state known as "hibernation," in which they cease contracting in an effort to survive.
(Minneapolis, MN) has patented a method for instantaneously stimulating a mammalian heart. The mammalian heart includes a first atrium and a second atrium.
The study, using mice as subjects, found that undifferentiated precursor cells grow new heart cells ?n a two-day-old mouse, but not in adult mice, settling a decades-old controversy about whether stem cells can play a role in the recovery of the adult mammalian heart following infarction--where heart tissue dies due to artery blockage.
His work also describes a cell culture developed by his team, which accurately mimics HCN function in whole mammalian hearts, making future research in the area far quicker and easier.