mammal

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mammal

 [mam´al]
an individual of the Mammalia, a division of vertebrates, including all that possess hair and suckle their young. adj., adj mammal´ian.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mam·mal

(mam'ăl),
An animal of the class Mammalia.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mammal

(măm′əl)
n.
Any of various warm-blooded vertebrate animals of the class Mammalia, including humans, characterized by a covering of hair on the skin and, in the female, milk-producing mammary glands for nourishing the young.

mam·ma′li·an (mă-mā′lē-ən) adj. & n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mammal

any animal of the class Mammalia, a group of about 4250 species, often regarded as the most highly evolved animals, and so named because they all possess MAMMARY GLANDS. There are three living subclasses:
  1. Monotremata - MONOTREMES, primitive egg-laying mammals such as the duck-billed platypus and Echidna, the spiny ant eater.
  2. Marsupialia - MARSUPIALS, which transfer their young to pouches for the latter part of their early development.
  3. Eutheria - EUTHERIANS, which have a placenta.

Mammals are characterized by the presence of hair, a DIAPHRAGM used in AERIAL RESPIRATION, milk secretion in the female (LACTATION) for suckling the young, presence of only the left systemic arch in the blood circulatory system, three auditory ossicles in the ear, and a lower jaw of a single pair of bones. In all classes except the monotremes, the young are born live (see VIVIPAROUS).

Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(117.) See, e.g., LJAF, Developing a National Model, supra note 7, at 5; Mamalian, supra note 86, at 2; Cadigan et al., supra note 96, at 4-6 (explaining that low-risk defendants should not be "over-supervised," but that high-risk defendants should generally be detained).
The suitability of the hydrogel membrane for wound dressings is further supported by the experiment done for the quantification of growth of the mamalian cells, which showed relative cell viabilities greater than one.
Mamalian prey of the common barn owl (Tyto alba) along the Texas coast.
The researchers wanted to know if tat might also be capable of directly regulating gene expression in mamalian cells.
Mamalian, Pretrial Justice Institute, State of the Science of Pretrial Risk Assessment 26 (2011), http://www.pretrial.org/download/risk-assessment/ PJI%20State%20of%20the%20Science%20Pretrial%20Risk%20Assessment%20(2011).pdf [https://perma.cc/MN8R-87QA] (summarizing the methodological challenges to creating an effective risk-assessment tool).