Trojan

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A proprietary condom which, like Hoovers in the UK and Kleenex in the US, has become a genericised trademark
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Trojan

A proprietary condom–the term is used in the US like Kleenex
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1)-(2) DCIG, Creating a Secondary Perimeter to Detect Malware in Your Enterprise Backup Environment, April, 20/9
The other advantage of measuring power to detect malware is that it is unaffected by the constant adaptation of cyberthreats.
"We often see multi-layered malware, such as droppers, and find malicious installers that install more than one program on a user's device.
The classes.dex and AndroidManifest.xml are the most delicate and important components of the APK file which are usually the high targets of malware creators (Shah & Researcher, 2011; Tchakounte & Dayang, 2013).
To verify the performance of MalNet, we perform evaluation experiments on a large dataset, which contains 21,736 malware samples from Microsoft and 20,650 benign samples collected by us.
The researchers reported that the malware gives itself administrator rights, becomes the default SMS app, and even has the ability to send and receive calls as well as SMS.
Wardle said the primary command-and-control server used by the malware had been shut down earlier but that many of the affected Macs had never been disinfected.
"The malware is really easy to re-purpose and use against other targets.
Malware detection methods are classified into different classes based on the type of malware and the techniques used for the analysis and detection of the malware damages that occur in the systems includes:
Check Point said that about 60% of the affected smartphones are in Asia but there have been only 700 cases of the malware targeting Israeli users.
To facilitate this activity, these malicious actors are increasingly using mobile smartphone applications containing malware. "Apps are the new battleground," said Jewel Timpe, malware research manager at Hewlett-Packard Security and one of the authors of the 2016 Hewlett-Packard Enterprise Cyber Risk Report.
More specifically, the usage of the Tor network, has introduced a new malware paradigm that could also threaten mobile security and privacy.