Malthusian catastrophe

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Malthusian catastrophe

A hypothetical limit on human population espoused by English theologian and scholar Thomas Robert Malthus in his 1798 Essay on the Principle of Population. Malthus believed that humans would eventually reproduce in such excess that they would surpass the limits of food supplies; once they reached this point, some sort of "catastrophe” was inevitable to control the population and human resources.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Another Inconvenient Truth: The World's Growing Population Poses a Malthusian Dilemma, Available from http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=growing population-poses-malthusian-dilemma.
Re The Malthusian Dilemma and the Judgement of God, News, February
As a consequence of this modern-day "Malthusian dilemma," it is past time to think boldly about the midrange future and to consider alternatives that go beyond merely slowing or stopping the growth of global population.