Malthusian catastrophe

(redirected from Malthusian crisis)

Malthusian catastrophe

A hypothetical limit on human population espoused by English theologian and scholar Thomas Robert Malthus in his 1798 Essay on the Principle of Population. Malthus believed that humans would eventually reproduce in such excess that they would surpass the limits of food supplies; once they reached this point, some sort of "catastrophe” was inevitable to control the population and human resources.
References in periodicals archive ?
Without a rich base of healthy plants, the population will outstrip food production, which will throw the world into a Malthusian crisis.
In fact one might step farther afield to acknowledge that the Green Revolution has, at least for a time, postponed the Malthusian crisis. In some ways Malthus' life encapsulated the history of agriculture in a world that, though beginning to industrialize, was still very agrarian.
Mayhew hypothesizes that Malthus's eclipse has stemmed from the optimism that the Malthusian crisis had been averted.
Unfortunately, efficiency in hunting in the unmanaged commons of the pre-Neolithic world, leads only down the road towards Malthusian crisis. Still, the trap was sprung when we invented agriculture and civilization, though seen from the perspective of the 21st century that looks as if it may be the greatest trap so far (Progress p.
China was not in the throes of a "Malthusian crisis," heedlessly breeding itself into oblivion.
Robisheaux's attention soon focuses on moralists' attempts to impose order, hierarchy and social discipline on the general population, illustrating the social changes effected by a growing Malthusian crisis of land hunger.
The key variable is the total number of individuals: for the neo-Malthusians this pushes against the limits to growth and engenders a Malthusian crisis, and for the cornucopians it stimulates the market responses which lead to new resources being exploited.
It was a European obsession, tied up in European fears of a Malthusian crisis, which was adopted after a lag by American writers such as H.L.
The impending Malthusian crisis of death by starvation and disease induced the monarchy to embark on institutional reforms that fostered development of industrial and commercial sectors.
This was exacerbated by the failure of agricultural production to keep up with population growth (a classic Malthusian crisis), and by the fact that peasants bore the brunt of the tax burden.
Only rarely, however, have the rhetorical dimensions of that characteristic situation of early modern society, the Malthusian crisis induced by war, plague, or dearth, been explored.
Postan's argument that Malthusian crisis was the engine behind the economic changes of the fourteenth century, helping to prepare his readers to move beyond Dyer's narrative to their own exploration of these debates.