Malthusian catastrophe

(redirected from Malthusian check)

Malthusian catastrophe

A hypothetical limit on human population espoused by English theologian and scholar Thomas Robert Malthus in his 1798 Essay on the Principle of Population. Malthus believed that humans would eventually reproduce in such excess that they would surpass the limits of food supplies; once they reached this point, some sort of "catastrophe” was inevitable to control the population and human resources.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
To him, this "new problem [was] hardly less serious." Whereas Malthus argued that prosperity always increased population because of innate instincts, Keynes feared a scenario where lower-class births would outpace the genetically fit, reducing the average "quality" of the society and thus the "average level of prosperity." He closed one lecture by saying that the old Malthusian check on overpopulation may still return after a "moment of turning." (16)
Marshall optimistically believed that emigration from overpopulated areas would ameliorate Malthusian checks and "benefit the world" by "this extension of the English race." (10) Keynes actively backed Marshall in an ongoing public debate with Karl Pearson, Professor of Eugenics at London University, over Nature vs.
It is natural thus to interpret the Great Famine as a Malthusian check to profligate population growth.
I most respectfully return Him the ticket." In the face of images of children dying of war and famine and plague--those Malthusian checks on population--Ivan's response is all too understandable.
The Malthusian checks on population--poverty, starvation, disease, and vice--may appear exaggerated in today's level of scientific and medical advancement, but such specters continue to haunt large parts of the world.
Although the time scale of neo-Malthusian predictions has had to be revised, their content is the same: without immediate preventive action, population growth will be suppressed by the Malthusian checks of famine, disease and war.