malpractice premium

malpractice premium

The annual fee paid by a medically qualified doctor or other licensee to a malpractice insurance carrier to cover the liability of medical practice.
In the US, the lowest premiums (roughly $4000/year) are in rehabilitation medicine in the southeastern states; the highest are in obstetrics, orthopaedics, and neurosurgery in New York, California, Florida and Massachusetts ($175K).
References in periodicals archive ?
The jury is still out on how the Affordable Care Act and other health reforms will affect the malpractice premium market, according to Mr.
(GAO) investigated rising malpractice premium rates and possible causes
Resident survey data are supplemented with malpractice premium data from the Medical Liability Monitor (MLM).
Sadly, medical malpractice "tort reform" has aimed to save medical malpractice premium dollars rather than make it an effective mechanism for assuring quality and efficiently compensating injury victims.
Every quarter brought the same problem: how to pay my malpractice premium, payroll, and health insurance without bouncing a check.
The Legislature finds and declares that there is a major health care crisis in the State of California attributable to skyrocketing malpractice premium costs and resulting in a potential breakdown of the health delivery system, severe hardships for the medically indigent, a denial of access for the economically marginal, and depletion of physicians such as to substantially worsen the quality of health care available to citizens of this state.
Third, to the extent that the growth of malpractice premium costs is passed on to patients through higher health insurance premiums, increases in malpractice liability could affect health insurance coverage and employment.
In summary, multiple factors have contributed to the recent increases in medical malpractice premium rates in the states we analyzed.
Feinstein's main focus in the wake of Bush's Scranton speech was that "before 1975, California had one of the highest malpractice premium rates in America.
[X1.sub.i] contains physician-specific human capital and practice structure variables, [X2.sub.m] contains market/geographic variables, [Z.sub.is] are fixed effects for procedure and specialty of physician performing the service, and [M.sub.i] contains the estimated measure of individual-specific malpractice premium payments.
The MEI weight of 4.0 percent and PPCIS weight of 5.5 percent are not dramatically different; however, when combined with the extremely high rates of malpractice premium inflation for several years, the resulting difference in the MEI is noticeable.
The jury is still out on how the Affordable Care Act and other health reforms will impact the malpractice premium market, according to Mr.