malignant

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malignant

 [mah-lig´nant]
tending to become progressively worse and to result in death; having the properties of anaplasia, invasiveness, and metastasis; said of tumors.

ma·lig·nant

(mă-lig'nănt),
1. occurring in severe form, and frequently fatal; tending to become worse and leading to an ingravescent course.
2. In reference to a neoplasm, having the property of locally invasive and destructive growth and metastasis.
[L. maligno, pres. p. -ans (ant-), to do anything maliciously]

malignant

/ma·lig·nant/ (-nant)
1. tending to become worse and end in death.
2. having the properties of anaplasia, invasiveness, and metastasis; said of tumors.

malignant

(mə-lĭg′nənt)
adj.
Medicine
a. Tending to metastasize: a malignant tumor.
b. Virulent or threatening to life: a malignant disease.

ma·lig′nant·ly adv.

malignant

[məlig′nənt]
Etymology: L, malignus, bad disposition
1 tending to become worse and to cause death. See also virulent.
2 (describing a cancer) anaplastic, invasive, and metastatic. malignancy, n.

malignant

Medspeak
adjective Tending to harm, kill, maim; pernicious, life-threatening; resistant to treatment; severe (as in malignant hypertension); threatening to life; virulent.
 
Oncology
adjective Referring to invasion and destruction of nearby tissue and spread to regions; referring to a neoplasm that invades surrounding tissue—which generally is unencapsulated—and grows by invasion, with vascular and lymphatic metastases.

malignant

adjective Medtalk Tending to harm, kill, maim, pernicious, life-threatening, resistant to treatment, severe–as in malignant HTN, threatening to life, virulent. Cf Benign Oncology Cancerous; a tendency to invade and destroy nearby tissue and spread to other regions; referring to a neoplasm that invades surrounding tissue, which generally is unencapsulated, grows by invasion, with vascular and lymphatic metastases. See Cancer, Carcinogens, Congenital malignancy, Multiple primary malignancy syndrome, Metastasis, Occult primary malignancy, Occupational malignancy, Oncogenes, Post-trauma malignancy, Premalignancy, Secondary malignancy.

ma·lig·nant

(mă-lig'nănt)
1. Resistant to treatment; occurring in severe form and frequently fatal; tending to become worse.
2. In reference to a neoplasm, having the properties of locally invasive and destructive growth and metastasis.

malignant

A term usually applied to cancerous tumours but also used to qualify unusually serious forms of various diseases tending to cause death unless effectively treated. The term is opposite in meaning to benign and derives from the Latin malignus , evil.

malignant

cancerous, capable of invading nearby tissue and spreading to other parts of the body.

Malignant

The term literally means growing worse and resisting treatment. It is used as a synonym for cancerous and connotes a harmful condition that generally is life-threatening.

malignant

locally invasive, destructive, neoplastic growth; can undergo metastasis

malignant (m·ligˑ·nnt),

adj type of cancerous growth with a tendency to metastasize and grow unchecked. See also metastasis.

ma·lig·nant

(mă-lig'nănt)
1. Resistant to treatment; occurring in severe form and frequently fatal; tending to become worse.
2. In reference to a neoplasm, having the properties of locally invasive and destructive growth.

malignant (məlig´nənt),

adj 1. resistant to treatment.
2. able to metastasize and kill the host.
3. describing a cancer.
malignant hypertension,
n the most lethal form of high blood pressure. It is a fulminating condition, characterized by severely elevated blood pressure that commonly damages the intima of small vessels, the brain, retina, heart, and kidneys. It affects more persons with racial diversity and may be caused by a variety of factors such as stress, genetic predisposition, obesity, the use of tobacco, the use of oral contraceptives, high intake of sodium chloride, a sedentary lifestyle, and aging.
malignant hyperthermia,
n an autosomal dominant trait characterized by often fatal hyperthermia with rigidity of muscles occurring in affected people exposed to certain anesthetic agents, particularly halothane and succinylcholine.

malignant

tending to become progressively worse and to result in death; having the properties of anaplasia, invasiveness and metastasis; said of tumors.

malignant aphtha
see contagious ecthyma.
malignant carbuncle
a form of anthrax in humans.
malignant catarrhal fever (MCF)
an acute highly infectious, fatal herpesvirus disease of cattle, farmed deer and occasionally pigs characterized by an erosive stomatitis and gastroenteritis, erosions on the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract, keratoconjunctivitis, encephalitis, and lymphadenopathy. There are at least two viruses involved. A wildebeest-associated form of the disease is caused by alcephaline herpesvirus 1. It occurs in most African countries in cattle which co-mingle with clinically normal wildebeest and hartebeest. It is epizootic and seasonal. It can also occur in zoological gardens in other countries. Sheep-associated MCF is caused by a poorly characterized virus, presumably ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2). Cases mostly occur when cattle have had contact with lambing ewes and usually start 1-2 months later. Goats can also act as a source of OvHV-2 infection for cattle. Cases without apparent or recent exposure to sheep do occur but are uncommon. Called also bovine malignant catarrh.
malignant edema
an acute infection of wounds by Clostridium septicum, C. chauvoei, C. perfringens, C. sordellii or C. novyi. The inflammation causes severe swelling and discoloration of skin and exposed tissues. There may be local subcutaneous emphysema and a frothy exudate, depending on the identity of the invading organism. There is a high fever and a profound toxemia; death follows within a few hours if treatment is not provided. Special occurrences are when a large number of animals are affected at one time. These include involvement of the vulva in recently lambed ewes, of shearing or docking wounds, and of the umbilicus or eyes of recently born lambs.
malignant fibrous histiocytoma
a rare aggressive tumor of dogs and cats; composed of densely packed fibroblasts and histiocytes.
malignant head catarrh
see malignant catarrhal fever.
malignant histiocytosis
see malignant histiocytosis.
malignant hyperthermia
see malignant hyperthermia, porcine stress syndrome.
malignant lymphoma
malignant pustule
see malignant carbuncle (above).
malignant theileriasis
theileriasis caused by Theileria hirci.

Patient discussion about malignant

Q. how many types of cancer are they?

A. There are over 200 different types of cancer. You can develop cancer in any body organ. There are over 60 different organs in the body where you can get a cancer.

Each organ is made up of several different tissue types. For example, there is usually a surface covering of skin or epithelial tissue. Underneath that there will be some connective tissue, often containing gland cells. Underneath that there is often a layer of muscle tissue and so on. Each type of tissue is made up of specific types of cells. Cancer can develop in just about any type of cell in the body. So there is almost always more than one type of cancer that can develop in any one organ.

Q. why does it call "cancer"?can you treat cancer?

A. the name came from the appearance of the cut surface of a solid malignant tumour, with the veins stretched on all sides as the animal the crab has its feet, whence it derives its name. Hippocrates first called it in that name after describing few types of cancer.
some of the cancers are treatable but that is a big subject. there are some very nice videos here on the site that can give you a clue about that. just search them there ^ :)

Q. Cancer - incurable? When i was surfing the internet for the incurable disease, i found CANCER is one among them. Is there not a medicine found yet? Really is it incurable?

A. I like to share with you what i read from a book it said 'With modern day treatments many cancers are completely cured but unfortunately there are still many others which are not.

Although it is not always possible to be certain, doctors are often able to tell whether or not a particular cancer might be cured. Even if cancer is incurable they will usually still offer treatment in the hope of prolonging life and, controlling, symptoms.'
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOBvDTf9ohQ

More discussions about malignant